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"The King's Speech"

Tom Hooper's film entitled The King's Speech there are various themes that are present; however, the particular theme that marvelled me was: life is much more difficult when one struggles with any type of disability. The director emphasizes the people's dismay by highlighting the expression on the faces of Bertie’s, prominently known as King George VI’s wife, his father King George V, and the archbishop.

A good portion of the film takes place in speech therapist Lionel Logue's office where Bertie and Lionel discuss and disagree on various topics. It goes to show how much more strain is put on people with disabilities since normal people aren't obliged to see a specialist weekly or daily. The setting in Lionel's therapy room feels cold and unpleasant with its fog stained windows and oddly patterned wallpaper reinforcing that this is not a place one would like to be.

Life with a disability affects not only Bertie but also everyone around him. Bertie can't even tell a bedtime story to his two young daughters without stammering in every sentence. While his wife's true intentions of marrying him are uncertain, she does make an effort to stand by his side and looks for someone to help him recover from his impediment.

In a nut shell, I have come in to realization such that I am favourably lucky because I have no such physical disability. However, I understand that physical disability is not the only disability one can have. There are mental, psychological and spiritual disabilities. I should say the essence of the movie would dwell on the moral that one has to be thankful with what he has. God has a purpose for every human person—his physicality, attitude, and other social aspects of human life. In other words, God knows best.
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