Rain of Gold

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 772
  • Published : April 13, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
This is a non-fiction book of many layers. It's about greed, prejudice, hate and anger, poverty and death. It's also about family, love, relationships, and dreams. Parallel stories are told of two children, both babies of their families, who grow up during the Mexican revolution. Children of war who are driven from their homes in Mexico, hoping for a better life in America. In America, however, they find that the Mexicans are treated no better than dogs. It was interesting to read about prejudice against Hispanics. We hear about prejudice against the blacks all the time, but don't think as much about what the Mexicans have gone through in immigrating to this country over the years. In the book, both children are raised by mothers with tremendous faith and abundant love, who do anything and everything to protect their children and to survive. One of my favorite quotes in the book gives a glimpse of what parenthood means. "The old woman took a big breath, fully realizing that no one could pass on to anyone the experiences of life. Each had to find their own way. This was, indeed, the frustration and yet the challenge of every parent. She drew Lupe close, giving her all her love. After all, wasn't it love, and only love, that a parent could pass on." As this book is the history of the author's parents, it's not a spoiler to say that the two children grow up, eventually meet and fall in love. It's a beautiful love story. Although the book ends, the author mercifully tells us a little more about their life together in the "author's notes." One of my friends recommended this book to me and told me that she thought it should be a required read for everyone. It certainly is one that shouldn't be passed over, there are so many nuggets of inspiration in the story and in the writing.
tracking img