Railroads in Green Lake, Wisconsin

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International Baccalaureate Internal Assessment

Subject: Geography Standard Level
Option: Populations In Transition

Title: The Effects of Locomotive Vehicles in the Population and Growth of Green Lake, Wisconsin Fieldwork Question:
How did the invention of locomotive vehicles affect the population of Green Lake, Wisconsin?

Candidate Name: Abigail Dee Polzer
Candidate session number:
Date of submission: April 10, 2013
Word count: 2,192

Contents Page Page

1.Contents Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

2. Hypothesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

3. Methods of Investigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5

4. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

5. Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12

6.Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

7. Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-13

8. Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Hypothesis

Locomotive vehicles changed the way goods and pedestrians were transported in regards to speed and accuracy. Instead of people relying on waterways for the fastest mode of transportation, trains were able to bring people and goods, such as lumber, closer to their destination at a more rapid pace. For these reasons, I believe that trains would drastically increase the population of Green Lake, Wisconsin in the mid to late 1800s.

Methods of Investigation

The majority of the information used in this report came directly from books and documents that are kept at the Dartford Historical Society in downtown Green Lake. I also had the opportunity to interview employees of the Dartford Historical Society, some of which have lived through the effects trains and cars had on the industrialization of Green Lake.

The Caestecker Public Library in Green Lake was a great resource. I found a book written about the development of the town written by Robert and Emma Heiple in the early 1970s that were actual residents of Green Lake and watched the transformation and evolution of the town evolve into a city. However, my favorite resource was by far the Dartford Historical Society. All of the employees were very helpful. I made several stops over a span of a few months. My first trip to the Historical Society was on February 22, 2013 where I was given a tour and explained my topic along with a few of my other classmates. I followed up on that visit a few weeks later where I interviewed former mayor of Green Lake, and town historian, Larry Behlen.

Introduction

Green Lake, Wisconsin, originally named Dartford, has always been a small town in terms of population and area. Green Lake has been called a tourist community with only 1,100 year-round residents. However, because of the beautiful lake used for many recreational purposes, the population is said to nearly triple from late May to early September.

The first person to reside in Green Lake was named James Powell in the early 1830s. By 1835 Powell was cultivating over 160 acres of land and selling it off in pieces. A portion of Powell’s land was sold to Anson Dart and his two sons who built the first framed house in the region. Because of this, Mr. Dart claimed he was the first official resident in the area and had named the town Dartford.

Years later residents wanted to change the name of the town because they felt Anson Dart did not deserve the positive recognition that came along with being the founder of a town. Travelers had already begun to...
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