Racial stereotyping

Page 1 of 7

Racial stereotyping

By | November 2012
Page 1 of 7
Racial Stereotyping
“And people are always saying he’s deceptively quick, deceptively athletic, and I don't know if that's just because I'm Asian or what it is, but obviously there's going to be stereotypes that you have to fight.” – Jeremy Lin, the first NBA player with Chinese or Taiwanese descent. Racial stereotypes within today’s society has brought an excessive amount of criticism and labeling which is unnecessary and irrelevant. Stereotypes in the past years have served to create unified negative images and perspectives of the certain races which are targeted. However, even with the negative aspects which stereotypes tend to lead to; society as a whole still does not refrain from stereotyping others. In context, stereotypes among public areas such as schools lead to conflict among students with various ethnic backgrounds. However, stereotypes can also be seen commonly among the business world’s jobs and workplaces. Such stereotyping within business matters creates tension among worker and a sense of unprofessionalism. The influences of such stereotypes can often negatively impact the overall success and progress of a company, firm, or business. From evidence, it can be concluded that racial stereotyping affects the emotions of the targeted race in a negative aspect due to the fact that stereotypes do not correctly portray or display the characteristics and properties of the targeted race.

Racial stereotypes can be clearly tracked down among today’s society; various ethnic groups specifically get targeted more frequently than others. The negatives of racial stereotyping can be specifically spotted throughout today’s society. However, the public recognizes what racial stereotyping is and how frequently it occurs within today’s society but the majority do not believe in significant change amongst the statistics within the next few years. From the textual evidence composed of various primary and secondary sources; racial stereotyping is a global issue...