Race Issues from 1877 to Present

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Corinne Cowan
Professor Cox
US History
16 December 2011
Race issues from 1877 to present
There are five themes that persist throughout American history. The five themes are mission, manifest destiny, industrialization, imperialism, and race. Racism has been an issue throughout American history. Only in recent years has the problem been resolved, but even now there is still some issues. Some private groups are still against some races.

Even though slavery was abolished in 1865 by the thirteenth amendment, it declared that "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction."[1] There was still racism issues continuing on after that. Much segregation was involved, separating the blacks and whites living in the United States. According to the “Visions of America” US History book, “during the late 1870s and early 1880s, Southern political leaders began to create a social and legal system of segregations called Jim Crow.[2] The Jim Crow laws were created to segregate African Americans from tons of different things of everyday life as possible. Keeping them from separate restaurants, schools, hotels, and railroad cars. Abolishing slavery was not the end of African American rights, segregation stepped in and kept the African Americans and the white people apart. In 1896, the Supreme court set up the case Plessy v. Ferguson made a doctrine that made the blacks and whites, separate but equal. Groups such as the Ku Klux Klan, are against any other ethnicities besides whites. Some of their actions included violence. The Ku Klux Klan began in 1866 right after the Civil War.

During 1948 President Truman issued desegregation in the Armed Forces. It was for equal treatment and opportunity in the armed forces without any issues to race, color, religion, or national origin.[3] The was the first time ever a president...
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