Rabies: Nervous System and Nearest Emergency Room

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What is Rabies?
Rabies is a viral disease that attacks the nervous system. It results in paralysis And almost certain death once the symptoms appear. Symptoms of rabies usually develop within two to eight weeks after getting infected. All warm-blooded animals can be infected by the virus, but in this area it is most likely to be seen in raccoons, foxes, skunks, bats, and unvaccinated cats and dogs. Rabies is a zoonotic disease (a disease that is transmitted to humans from animals) that is caused by a virus. The disease infects domestic and wild animals, and is spread to people through close contact with infected saliva via bites or scratches. Rabies is present on all continents with the exception of Antartica, but more than 95% of human deaths occur in Asia and Africa. Once symptoms of the disease develop, rabies is nearly always fatal. How is Rabies spread?

The rabies virus is present in the saliva of the rabid animal. The most common way the disease is spread is by a bite or scratch from an infected animal. Rabies can also be spread if the infected animal’s saliva comes in contact with fresh scratches, open wounds, or mucous membranes like eyes, nose and mouth. Those most likely to be exposed to rabies are cats and dogs that are allowed to roam, farm animals, and humans who hunt, hike and camp. What are Symptoms of Rabies in Humans?

The symptoms of rabies in humans include:
* Irritability, * head ache, * pain, * itching or * a twitching at the infection site, * fever.

As the disease progresses, muscle spasms in the throat and respiratory tract affect breathing, and the sufferer may have difficulty swallowing, the combination of which can produce the trademark “foaming at the...
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