Rabbit Proof Fence Summary

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Rabbit proof fence

Rabbit-Proof Fence is not fiction. It is the true story of three Aborigine children Molly and Daisy and their cousin, Gracie who in 1931 were taken forcibly from their mothers and their home in Jigalong in the north of Australia and moved to the Moore River Native Settlement over a thousand miles away. Rabbit-Proof Fence is the story of their remarkable escape from the settlement and their adventures on the journey home to Jigalong.

It was government policy to remove children from their homes against their will. Molly, Daisy and Gracie were three such children. The chief Protector of the Aborigines believed the best way to solve Australia's "coloured problem" is to breed the aboriginal blood out of mixed-race children. The way to do that is to make sure so called "half castes" don't marry full blooded Aborigines.

So between the late 80 and early 60s in Australia atleast 100,000 Aboriginal children, especially hybrids, were forcibly removed from their families and grown in the custody of the state. They were taken to places like re-education camps, where they were "prepared" for their new life in white society and, educated as whites, above all, allowing them to have sex only with the white race. In this way, it ensured the constant purification, generation after generation.

Molly, her sister Daisy and cousin Gracie, who lived with their families in the desert Jigalong Western Australia, one day were taken by state and transported 1,500 km away, erased the identity, forced to adapt to a strange new world. These three girls Molly, Daisy and Gracie decided too flee from Moore River mission and go back home to there family. With all their courage and their hope, they went thorugh and a long journey through the rugged outback nature, relying on intuition and ancestral knowledge of nature.The three girls were able to survive thanks to lucky encounters with these strange and brave in the presence of settlers and other Aboriginal nomads....
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