Questions in 'No Sugar'

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Plays and texts all raise questions hat need to be answered. Jack Davis, through his play 'No Sugar' raises questions about the survival of the Aboriginal culture from the devastating impacts of colonialism. However, Davis omits the use of dramatic closure in his play, as to force the audience to answer these questions themselves, rather than relying on answers provided in the play.

Many questions about the Aboriginal culture are conveyed through the character Jimmy. Throughout the play he challenges the authority of the 'white' culture and refuses to submit to it. This refusal to adapt his behaviour to fit 'white' etiquette is most visible in Act one scene 5 when he is arrested and goes to court. Within this scene Jimmy answers only to that name, rather than the anglicised 'James Emmanuel Munday' and speaks brashly and without thought of consequences. He refuses to back down to the 'white' establishment of court, and therefore to 'white' colonialism. Jimmy is seen as a kind of crusader for the Aboriginal culture, fighting for its continuance with every word he speaks. Therefore his sudden demise leads the audience to question whether this ancient yet powerful culture can maintain its precarious grip on s people. Jimmy's death was not peaceful, and it wasn't neatly packed away, giving the audience time to adjust to his absence. His death was unexpected and sudden; the very nature it- a heart attack- embodies the cruel and swift way in which he departs. Jimmy's death not only reuses to answer the questions he raised in his lifetime, namely the right of 'white' culture to dominate his own, but further still raises questions of its own. His death prompts the audience to ask what will become of the Aboriginal culture, if its supports are not there to up hold it.

In addition to the demise of Jimmy within 'No Sugar' Davis also constructs the ending of the play to raise important questions, and to leave them for the audience to answer. The end of the play is also...
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