Pyrolysis of Bamboo

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Renewables from Biomass and Waste

PYROLYSIS KINETICS OF BAMBOO MATERIAL Geert Pottersa, Gerd Schoetersa, Tom Tytgata, György Horvatha, Carlo Ludeckea, Pegie Coolb, Silvia Lenaertsa, Lise Appelsc, Raf Dewilc Department of Bioscience Engineering, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium b Laboratory of Adsorption and Catalysis, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk, Belgium c Chemical and Biochemical Process Technology and Control Section, Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, W. De Croylaan 46, B-3001 Heverlee, Belgium e-mail addresses: geert.potters@ua.ac.be, raf.dewil@cit.kuleuven.be Abstract Biomass-energy is generally considered to be a source of renewable energy that will make the most significant contribution to sustainable energy generation. However, the large-scale cultivation of energy crops is controversial, because of competition with food crops for agricultural land use. Therefore, the development of energy crops that can be grown on polluted soils (not suited for agriculture), should be pursued. Taking into account these considerations, bamboo is a promising energy crop. These plants keep their growth in extreme circumstances and even have the potential for soil remediation (fytoremediation). Moreover, bamboo is one of the fastest growing crops, securing a high yield. The properties of bamboo as a bio-fuel have not yet been sufficiently investigated. The main aim of this work is to study the behavior of bamboo material (shoots and leaves) during pyrolysis. The kinetic parameters were calculated from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data (reaction rate coefficient and its temperature dependency). A heat balance was developed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The obtained results provide information on course of conversion and lay the foundation for the design of a full-scale pyrolysis-installation. Moreover bamboo can be compared with other energy crops concerning required energy and kinetics. Keywords: Bamboo, pyrolysis, reaction kinetics, TGA, DSC a

EMChIE 2010, Mechelen – Belgium

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Renewables from Biomass and Waste

INTRODUCTION Energy from biomass is recognized as the renewable energy source with the highest potential towards sustainable development in the near future [1-3]. Biomass provides already 14% of the world’s primary energy production [4], but is largely squandered by inefficient use and unsustainable exploitation. Biomass includes all organic matter that is available on a renewable basis: energy crops and all kinds of organic wastes. In the European Union wood waste accounts for 94% of the currently used biomass for energy [5]. In the medium and long term, residues from agriculture and forestry, and energy crops will respectively further develop the bio-energy industry [5]. However, the large-scale cultivation of energy crops is controversial, because of competition with food crops for agricultural land use. Therefore, the development of energy crops that can be grown on polluted soils (not suited for agriculture), should be pursued. Taking into account these considerations, bamboo is a promising energy crop. These plants keep their growth in extreme circumstances and even have the potential for soil remediation (fytoremediation). Moreover, bamboo is one of the fastest growing crops, securing a high yield. The energy density of bamboo (as well as other solid biofuels) is low, but can be increased significantly by thermochemical conversion. This paper targets fast pyrolysis as conversion technology because of its efficient energy production and the important advantage that mainly liquid fuels and solid char are formed, both easy to store and to transport. Pyrolysis oil moreover contains various chemicals with specific added-value applications [2]. The most important technological issues that remain to be solved before large scale use becomes possible, are related to...
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