Purple Heart

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The history of the purple heart goes all the way back to the revolutionary war. Although it wasn’t called the purple heart, George Washington had established the badge of military merit, then established by the commander-in-chief of the continental army by the order from Newburgh, New York headquarters on august 7,1782. Although the badge of military merit was only awarded to three revolutionary war soldiers it was never abolished but it was not proposed again until October 10,1927. Army chief of staff general Charles Pelot Summerall put in a draft bill to receive the badge of military merit, a few months later on January 3,1928 the bill was withdrawn and all actions on the case ceased but the adjutant general instructed to keep all files for future possible use. Many private parties sought out to have the medal back in the army, one of which these groups were the board of directors of Fort Ticonderoga Museum in New York. The Badge of Military Merit was created by George Washington in 1782 and the badge was awarded for bravery in combat, the purple heart was designed to commemorate soldiers bravery as well as recognize the ones who were wounded or killed. Later during world war II the purple heart medal was changed into a medal to recognize only those who were injured or killed in combat, since then the reasons how to receive the award changed to add soldiers injured in acts of terrorism and military personnel injured by friendly fire. The purple heart is one of the most recognized symbol for combat injuries and the sacrifice of military personnel safety. It is not an award which someone is recommended more of an award of their heroism. On January 7, 1931 General Douglaas MacArthur reopened work on a new design. This design was to incorporate George Washingtons 200th birthday, An army heraldic specialist know as Elizabeth Will was the one to redesign the newly revived medal, which got the name Purple Heart. With general specifications she was told she designed the Purple heart. The purple heart was revived on Febuary 22, 1932 for George Washington’s 200th birthday out of respect to him for his memory and military achievements. The purple heart award is a heart shaped medal with a gold trim border and also contains a profile of George Washington, above George washingtons profile is the shield of the coat of arms of George Washington between two green leaves. On the back is a raised bronze heart with the words “for military merit” right below the shield and leaves. The purple heart ribbon is 1 and 3/8 inches wide and has 3 strips 2 white stripes 1/8 inch on both sides of a purple stripe 1 and 1/8 inchs wide. Additional awards of the purple heart are given in oak leaf clusters and by gold stars 5/16 inch size. The criteria for the award was announced in the war department on February 22,1932 and was an authorized award for soldiers with their request, to any soldier who had been awarded the Meritorious Service citation Certificate, army wounded ribbon or if they were authorized to wear Wound Chevrons, after April 5,1917 right before the united states went into World War I. During the early portion of world war II the purple heart was awarded to soldiers for wounds received from the enemies and for meritorious performance of duty, with the Legion of Merit being established the purple heart was no longer given for Meritorious performance. On june 13, 1985 the Purple Heart was moved the precedence from aboce the good conduct medal to immediately above the Meritorious Service Medals, as well soldiers could receive the medal as a result of friendly fire. On may 18 1998 they had changed the criteria for who receives the medal again and no longer would authorize the Purple heart to any civilian of the united states who were serving with authorities of the armed forces. The Exact criteria for the purple heart is any member of the Uninted states armed forces who while serving under...
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