Puritan Dbq

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The Puritans were an extremely religious group of people whose pilgrimage to North America began the development of the lifestyle established in the New England colonies primarily beginning in 1630 and going through the 1660’s. One large component of the newly established lifestyle that the Puritan ideas and values influenced was the social aspect of society that accumulated most of its focus on a sense of community and religion. Another important aspect of this New England lifestyle that Puritan ethics shaped was the community’s politics, which was also influenced greatly by religious beliefs. The third vastly important portion of the New England lifestyle was its economic development, which too, was influenced by Puritan beliefs. Overall, the entire foundation of the New England society’s social, political and economic development was influenced by Puritan ideas and values, which focused on religious values and a strong cohesive community.

The social aspect of the New England society took the greatest influence from Puritan ethics in every detail from Puritan life. One vastly reoccurring ideal in the social lifestyle was a sense of family and compassion throughout the community. As stated by John Winthrop, in 1630 at the beginning of New England life, “Wee must uphold a familiar commerce together in all meekness, gentleness, patience and liberality. Wee must delight in eache other; make other’s conditions our owne; rejoice together, mourne together, labour and suffer together…” (Doc A). These words from John Winthrop speak on an extremely emotional level and preach how living together as one big happy family with ultimately grant success and, always relating to religion, make God happy to witness the community’s unity. Religion as a whole was a powerful catalyst is the social development in New England. This is prominently shown in the Enlarged Salem Covenant of 1636, which discusses the people of this society, “Promising also unto our best ability to teach...
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