Psychosocial Development and the Effects of Teenage Pregnancy

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Psychosocial Development and the Effects of Teenage Pregnancy Liberty University

Abstract
An estimated 400,000 teen girls, ages 15-19 years, give birth each year in the US. In today’s media sexual activity and teen parenting is often glamorize, but the truth of the matter is the reality is harshly different. Having a child during the teen’s formative years carries the high price of emotional, physical, and financial, not only to the mother, but father, child, and community. Parents, educators, and community organizations all have a major role to play in reducing teen pregnancy.

Psychosocial Development and the Effects of Teenage Pregnancy Table of Contents

Abstract………………………………………………. 1 Introduction…………………………………………. 2 Background………………………………………….4 Is Teen Parenthood Being Glamorized…………….5
Possible Theories to Explain This Phenomenon…...6
11 Facts about Teenage Pregnancy………………..10
Recommendations…………………………………11
Conclusion…………………………………………16 References…………………………………………17

Introduction
In 2009, an amazing 409,840 infants were born to teen mothers between the ages of 15−19 year olds that makes for a live birth rate of 39.1 per 1,000 women in this age group. Nearly two-thirds of births to women younger than age 18 and more than half of those among 18−19 year olds are unintended. Within the US birth rate for teen mothers fell by more than one-third from 1991 through 2005, but then increased by 5 percent over two consecutive years. Data for 2008 and 2009, however, indicate that the long-term downward trend has resumed. The U.S. teen pregnancy and birth, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and abortion rates are substantially higher than those of other western industrialized nations. Teen pregnancy accounts for more than $9 billion per year in costs to U.S. taxpayers for increased health care and foster care, increased incarceration rates among children of teen parents, and lost tax revenue because of lower educational attainment and income among teen mothers. Pregnancy and birth are significant contributors to high school dropout rates among girls. Only about 50% of teen mothers receive a high school diploma by age 22, versus nearly 90% of women who had not given birth during adolescence. The children of teenage mothers are more likely to have lower school achievement and drop out of high school, have more health problems, be incarcerated at some time during adolescence, give birth as a teenager, and face unemployment as a young adult. These effects remain for the teen mother and her child even after adjusting for those factors that increased the teenager’s risk for pregnancy; such as, growing up in poverty, having parents with low levels of education, growing up in a single-parent family, and having low attachment to and performance in school. The statistics previously stated are freighting. In the United States of America, teenage pregnancy is an epidemic, we have so many young people having babies and they have the slightest idea of how to be good parents. A lot of these girls aren't developmentally ready to be really effective parents, and that affects the child's development. (http://www.cdc.gov/TeenPregnancy/AboutTeenPreg.htm). Background

Teenage pregnancy has been a hot topic subject with great debate over the past two decades. Parents, politicians, the media, and researchers have voice many concerns about the consequences of teen parenthood for not only the mothers but the children as well. Because of the high intensity of the subject there have been many studies into the factors that could predispose teens toward teenage pregnancy and the outcomes for the children. According to Hudson & Iniechen, “Much of this has served to emphasize the negative aspects of teenage pregnancy, with a variety of interrelated factors such as poverty, low educational attainment, unemployment, family background, emotional/psychological difficulties and a history of sexual abuse being generally accepted as increasing...
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