Psychometric Test

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Assessing the ability of blind and partially sighted people: are psychometric tests fair?

1. Introduction

Psychometric or standardised tests are assessments that measure knowledge, abilities, attitudes and personality traits. They are used in education and recruitment and can consist of written, online or oral tests. Blind and partially sighted individuals are potentially disadvantaged by the use of these tests.

RNIB is often approached by teachers and parents concerned about the use of standardised/psychometric testing in education and whether these tests can be suitably adapted or are relevant to blind and partially sighted children. This led to the initial question "what do we know about the use of psychometric testing with blind and partially sighted people?"

RNIB's Centre for Accessible Information (CAI) conducted this literature review to establish what relevant literature and research is available on how psychometric tests can be adapted and are used with people with sight loss. The scope of the project included standardised tests in both education and employment. The literature review was conducted between November 2011 and January 2012

2. Method

Following an initial scan of literature related to psychometric testing for blind and partially sighted people, the author focused the literature review across three themes: 1. Psychometric tests developed for sighted people and used with blind and partially sighted people. Within this the author considered why these tests are used, the adaptations that are made to the tests, and the issues faced by blind and partially sighted users when accessing these tests. 2. Psychometric tests developed for and standardised on blind and partially sighted people, including the strengths and weaknesses of certain tests and their usage. 3. The use of technology and computerised tests as a way of making tests accessible to all.

3. Key findings from the research

3.1...
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