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DATE: FEBRUARY 5, 2013

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 4
BY : BENEDICT LOYOLA
SUBMITTED TO : ARCH. NIC FERNANDO

RESEARCH “CITY HALL”

Design of the City Hall. The city hall is essentially an office building, not a monument or an ornament. The building should be so designed as to be economical in construction and maintenance. True long-range economy is achieved by a judicious balance between original cost and maintenance cost. A building with cheap materials and equipment for the sake of low first cost may be quite expensive in maintenance and replacement. Even though the city hall should be basically functional and not a monument, originality in design is not precluded.

Steps to be taken in Planning and Constructing a City Hall

* determining need.
* determining space requirements.
* selecting an architect.
* acquiring a site.
* approving layout, design, and architectural features.
* developing a financial plan.

Note: These steps are not a one-two-three process: frequently they must be done simultaneously. It is important to have an idea of what is wanted before selecting an architect, but the architect can be helpful in delineating wants.It is important to remember that the city hall must last 60 years or more. The following "dos and don'ts" provide a guide to officials engaged in planning a new city hall. Do:

* Locate the city hall where it will be most convenient and if possible where land values are reasonable. * Be prepared to provide the architect with information on departments to be housed, the number of employees, types of furnishings and equipment, and special requirements such as vault and storage space. * Put most or all city department headquarters in the city hall. * Provide for structural expansion and flexibility in office layout. * Plan the city hall from the inside out with emphasis on workflow, convenience to the public, and convenience for employees. * Provide for the comfort and efficiency of employees with controlled ventilation and adequate lighting. * Provide for employee lounges and restrooms.

* Use materials, construction, and furnishings which make the city hall easy to maintain. * Provide open, unobstructed counters for transactions with the public. Don't:

* Don't locate in an area of declining property values except when part of a comprehensive urban renewal program. * Don't try to remodel an old post office, school building, convention hall, or other building designed for some other special use. * Don't forget that the city hall is an office building, not a monument or an ornament . * Don't underestimate space needs; the average commercial office building lasts 67 years. * Don't tie up valuable space with indoor pistol ranges, drive-through garages, private exits, wide corridors, and other gadgets. * Don't cut up the city hall into cubbyholes for minor officials. * Don't build the city hall over two stories in height If at all possible. * Don't let the public come In contact with police or criminal activities. * Don't provide in the main lobby any facilities, such as a cigar and soft drink stand, which encourage loitering.

DETERMINING NEED

The need for a new city hall may seem obvious to those who spend their working hours at the city hall . Ceilings are high ; heating costs are twice what they should be ; space originally meant for storage has been converted to offices; electrical wiring violates code provisions; and the present facility is just old anyway. All of this-and more besides-may be true, but what is not known is how extensive the need is . This must be determined by careful study. In determining the need for a city hall alternate courses of action should be studied.

Determining the extent of need involves two areas:
* Condition of building & Space needs.

The condition of the building is the easiest to evaluate . Things to be considered are type of construction,...
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