Psychological Needs

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Psychological Needs

Dulce J. Fernandez

PSY/211

April 16, 2013
Dr. Dale Ironson

Psychological Needs

In the early 1940s, a humanistic psychologist known as Abraham Maslow developed a

model for human motivation. Through this human hierarchy model Maslow demonstrated that

humans are motivated by a progression of needs. According to Maslow, people first become

motivated by physiological needs. Furthermore, once physiological needs are satisfied they

progress to the level of psychological needs, and ultimately they progress to the needs of self-

fulfillment. Maslows’s motivation theory is known as the hierarchy of needs (Huckenbury &

Huckenbury, 2014).

According to Maslow (1943), the hierarchy of needs is divided by five levels of needs.

The hierarchy model is depicted in the shape of a pyramid with the larger and lower-levels on the

bottom and the need for self-fulfillment at the top. The top level, which is at the peak of the

pyramid, is described as the level of achieving ones full potential. Following the top level of

self-actualization is the level of esteem. In this level, people are motivated by fulfilling a need of

self-respect and the acceptance from others. After the level of esteem comes the level of love and

belonging. In the level of love and belonging Maslow describes the need of others to fulfill a

sense of attachment to a relationship; whether it is friendship, intimate, or family. Subsequently

following the level of love and belonging is the level of safety and security. This level describes

the need to build financial, personal, health, and safety security. Last, the level of physiological

needs ranks to be the lower level of the pyramid. The level of physiological needs is described by

Maslow as fulfillment of metabolic requirements for survival. Needs for survivals based on

Maslow’s hierarchies of needs are; air, food, water, homeostasis, sex, and sleep. All four lower

levels of the pyramid are divided as physiological needs and psychological needs. The top level

of self-actualization is the level of self-fulfillment (Green, 2000).

The concept of Marlow’s hierarchy of needs is easily understood; however, I do not fully

agree with the theory. I agree with the needs described by Maslow such as fulfilling basic

physiological needs as well as psychological needs; nonetheless, I do not see a need for it to be

broken down in levels. I believe the hierarchy of needs explains motivation as if there is only one

path in life to follow. It demonstrates that first people should fulfill metabolic requirements, to

fulfill the need of personal safety, followed by the need of fulfillment of belonging, to the need of

acceptance, and finally leading to self-actualization. What if you fulfill the metabolic

requirements, possess a sense of belonging, fulfill the need of self-acceptance; however, you lack

the fulfillment of personal security? What happens if one level is met before the other? Maslow’s

hierarchy of needs does not give an explanation describing any type of results if one need is met

before the next level in the hierarchy. I believe it is possible to meet one level before the other;

therefore, explaining the theory in levels may not be adequate. Perhaps approaching the theory as

a balance of all needs of fulfillment would be more adequate than breaking it down in levels.

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs relates to motivation because it explains how humans are

growth-oriented. The hierarchy also describes that when one need is fulfilled, the need becomes

satisfied; therefore, it will motivate an individual to grow and continue to the next need of

fulfillment. Based on Maslow’s hierarchy, I do not find any of the needs to be challenging. I find

myself to be a well-rounded person with strong values and morals. I value personal relationships,

family,...
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