Psychological Adjustment Profiles of Talented Professional Baseba...

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Psychological Adjustment Profiles of Talented Professional Baseball Players: Picher’s Versus Hitters

By | November 2012
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Brian Rodriguez
Sports Psychology
Mrs. Crews
September 13th 2012
Psychological Adjustment Profiles of Talented Professional Baseball Players: Picher’s versus Hitters The study titled “Psychological Adjustment Profiles of Talented Professional Baseball Players: Picher’s versus Hitters” by Jennifer S. Parker from the University of South Carolina-Upstate covers a very important topic on the psychology of Professional baseball pitcher and hitter years after retirement. The question of the article is whether or not a hitters and pitchers, who did not become wealthy from their professional career, affects their competitiveness, occupation, parental, marital and homecare behavior years after retirement. Jennifer S. Parker clearly states this in her introduction. This knowledge is very important to the field because the study clearly shows that the psychology of a Professional Baseball player years after retirement is affected because of their professional careers. Jennifer S. Parker also clearly states her hypothesis that former players are well-adjusted after leaving professional baseball and then supports her hypothesis in the following study.

Jennifer S. Parker begins by explaining the samples of her study by including the age and skill level of her participants. The participants were 50 former professional baseball pitchers with a mean age of 55.42 years, and 52 former professional baseball hitters with a mean age of 55.96 years. Only three pitchers and one hitter played in the Triple A level and none of the pitchers played in more than 39 MLB games and none of the hitters played in more than 162 games. Most of these players played 5-7 years but only at the triple A leve. With this being said, I believe that this is the appropriate sample for this study because none of these players could have become wealthy from 39-162 games in the MLB. The study does support the hypothesis by providing valid measures. The study had six scales to measure;...