Psy Split Brain in Man

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  • Topic: Michael Gazzaniga, Split-brain, Optic nerve
  • Pages : 1 (266 words )
  • Download(s) : 222
  • Published : October 12, 2012
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Method
Participants
The participants consisted of 4 patients who had undergone surgery 3-5 years prior-to the experiment due to severe seizures. Participants ranged from 37 to 63 years of age, and a mean age of 51 years (SD = 10.24). Design

This natural case study design included Independent variables (a) the visual field, and (b) the hand of the participant. These were measured by the participant’s intellectual processing of information. The Dependent variables (a) the participants ability to say the word, and (b) the participants ability to retrieve the object, were measured by assessing the participants ability to transfer messages from the cerebral hemispheres to the neural mechanisms. Materials

The experiment measured participants response to stimulus, determining whether the cerebral hemispheres can communicate. Each test consisted of materials (a) the screen, and (b) the object. Being shown a word in either visual field tested the participants capability to process the visual stimulus, and share information between the cerebral hemispheres. Procedure

Participants were positioned in-front of the visual field and instructed to speak the word displayed and retrieve the object. When testing the phenomenon, the brain and optic chiasm was split. Therefore, the patient was only able to transfer visual information from the left eye to the left brain, promoting the function of the corresponding hand and vice versa. References Gazzaniga, M. (2005). Forty-five years of split-brain research and still going strong. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 6(8), 653–659. doi: 10.1038/nrn1723. Gazzaniga, M. (1967). The split brain in man. Scientific American, 217(2), 24-29. doi: 10.1038/scientificamerican0867-24.
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