Proudly South African

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 3287
  • Published : February 22, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Life orientation
Paralympics
Group members:
Cleo arendse
Danielle Africa
Jamie Williams
Charne downes

Names of different Paralympics Games Sport. . .
* Archery
* Athletics
* Boccia
* Cycling Road
* Cycling Track
* Equestrian
* Football 5-a-side
* Football 7-a-side
* Goal Ball
* Judo
* Power Lifting
* Rowing
* Sailing
* Shooting
* Table Tennis
* Sitting Volleyball
* Wheelchair Basketball
* Wheelchair Fencing
* Wheelchair Rugby
* Wheelchair Tennis

The host city of the 2012 Paralympics. . .
* London, England, United Kingdom
* The Paralympics’ games will be held at London Olympic Stadium.

Motto. . .
* Inspire a Generation

There are 164 nations participating in 503 events in 20 various sports. The Opening ceremony takes place on 29th August and the closing ceremony takes place on 9th September. The Olympics was officially opened by Queen Elizebeth.

What is classification . . .?
Classification helps to define which athletes are eligible to compete in each of the sports. It also helps to ensure a level playing field by grouping athletes into classes based on their ability to perform a certain activity. How are athletes’ classification defined . . .?

Every athlete competing at the Games has gone through an evaluation, conducted by authorised technical officials called “classifiers”, who are appointed by the international governing body of that particular sport. It is a long-term and in some cases ongoing process which takes place at all major events, before and during completion. How does it work . . .?

Classifiers assess the athletes’ impairment and how it impacts on their ability to perform certain functions in the sport. After each evaluation the athletes are assigned a sport class.
Events. . .
* Men’s & women’s 100m.
* Men’s & women’s 200m.
* Men’s & women’s 400m.
* Men’s & women’s 800m.
* Men’s & women’s 1 500m.
* Men’s & women’s 5 000m.
* Men’s & women’s 4×100m relay.
* Men’s & women’s 4×400m relay.
* Men’s & women’s marathon.
* Men’s & women’s long jump.
* Men’s triple jump.
* Men’s high jump.
* Men’s & women’s shot put.
* Men’s & women’s javelin.
* Men’s & women’s discus.
* Men’s & women’s club

Classes. . .
* 11-13: Athletes with visual impairment
* 20: Athletes with intellectual impairment
* 31-46: Athletes with cerebral palsy
* 40-46: Athletes with limb or deficiency
* 51-58: Athletes competing in wheelchairs.
The first number of each class symbolises the disability group while the last number reflects on severity – the lower the number, the heavier the disability. A “T” or an “F” is added in front of each number to signal whether the athlete competes in track or field events.

Facts (and Phrases). . .
* With athletes being the most ancient form of activity and, in many ways, the symbol of Olympic ideology, it was an obligatory inclusion to the first Paralympics, in Rome in 1960. * Only two Paralympian athletes have ever competed at athletics in the Olympics. American Marla Runyan won five Paralympics’ gold medals between 1992 and 1996 before qualifying for the Olympics. She came eight in the 1 500m final in Sydney 2000, and also competed in Athens 2004. * South African sprinter Oscar Pastorals then followed her lead when he competed in both the 400m and 4×400m at the London 2012 Olympics.

Legends. . .
* The most successful Paralympian in terms of medals is Franz Nietlispach of Switzerland, who won a formidable 14 gold and six silver medals between 1980 and 2000. He has also competed in hand cycling and table tennis, and is now a politician in his home country. * Tanni Grey-Thompson, who has won 11 gold medals in wheelchair racing, is among Britain’s most successful Paralympian of all time.

Fun facts about Olympic Games. . .
1. The...
tracking img