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Drena Dayton
The Ice Age and Ohio
Dr. Adil M. Wadia
April 01, 2013

Glazier Features Observed in Wayne County

Ground Moraine (14,000 to 24,000 years old)- Ground Moraines often show up as rolling, strangely shaped land covered in grass or other vegetation. They don't have the sharp ridges of other moraines. A ground moraine is made of sediment that slowly builds up directly underneath a glazier by tiny streams, or as the result of a glazier meeting hills and valleys in the natural landscape. When a glazier melts, the ground moraine underneath is exposed. Ground moraines are the most common type of moraine and can be found on every continent.

End Moraine (14,000 to 24,000 years old)- As the ice receded, it stopped at various points and built up land form features known as end moraines. End Moraines are ridges that vary in height and composition depending on the length of time the ice remained at a particular point and on the materials being eroded. They are irregular ridges of glacial sediments that form at the margin or edge of the ice sheet. Alternatively, end moraines may form as a glacier re-advances and pushes soft sediment in front of it, creating what is often called a small push moraine. The outermost end moraine is given the special name terminal end moraine. End moraines are ridges of glacial drift usually glacial till that form at the edge of the ice sheet.

Out-wash-Deposit of sand and gravel carried by running water from the melting ice of a glacier and laid down in stratified deposits. An out-wash may attain a thickness of 100 m (328 feet) at the edge of a glacier, although the thickness is usually much less; it may also extend many kilometers in length. For example, out-wash deposits from the Wisconsin Glaciation can be traced to the mouth of the Mississippi River, 1,120 km (700 miles) from the nearest glacial terminus. The sheet of out-wash maybe pitted with full kettles or dissected by post-glacial streams. Out-wash plains...