Propaganda Technique

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Tam Nguyen
21 March 2013
Propaganda technique and its influences
Generally, we don’t like advertisements and tend to avoid them when we are watching TV, enjoy a music video on YouTube, or surfing on the Internet; but unfortunately, those advisements have affected really much on our decisions. Do you believe it? The truth is that we see over 200 ads a day following the Consumer Reports Website. Additionally, Tony Marlow, the director of strategic insights at Yahoo claimed that: “Ninety five percent of the decisions we make are made at an unconscious level.” As the result, we unconscious store a hundred of advertisements in our brains through the newspaper, TV commercials, magazines and Facebook. Consequently, those “memories” about the ads becomes our experiences and make us believe that we buy the right product at the right place. The marketer or advertiser has researched the consumer’s opinions, and based on those opinions, they create the advertisings with the propaganda techniques such as Name Calling, Glittering Generalities, Transfer, Testimonial, Plain Fork, Card Stacking and Band Wagon and other advertising techniques such as Sex Appeal, Ideal Family, Sounds Good and Repetition. There are a lot more techniques that they use to persuade the consumers, but in my opinion, the most three effective methods impact our decisions are Sex Appeal, Card Stacking, and Ideal Family. First of all, Sex Appeal is the most popular propaganda technique which successfully gets our attention. As the name of this technique, it uses the attractive bodies or parts of the body to seduce us in order to keep our eyes on the screen. We can see the Sex Appeal technique through cosmetic, perfume, cloth or even food advertisings, for example Dior, Channel, Abercrombie and Carl’s Jr. advertise. However, in my opinion, there’s one out standing advertisement using the Sex Appeal propaganda technique in marketing water; that is Contrex’s exercise campaign. In that advertise, a series...
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