Promoting Person Centered Values

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Promoting person-centred values
‘Respect is important to me. People should take you as you are, and you should do the same to them.’ Elaine, Self-advocate

1

Introduction
We all have our own values that have developed as a result of our family and childhood experiences, and as a result of our friendships and relationships. Our values are also influenced by people in our local community, as well as by national figures and the media. Support workers in social care are expected to promote particular values. There are two important points to note. First, the idea that learning disability workers are supporting a person. It is not a question of being in charge or in control, because choice and decision-making should lie with the person, as far as possible. Second, it is very important that these principles are part of your everyday work. There should be nothing special about them, they should be part of day-to-day life.

Learning outcomes
This chapter will: • explain the need to promote person-centred values, and what each of the following terms means when supporting people who have a learning disability: ° individuality ° rights ° choice ° privacy ° independence ° dignity ° respect ° partnership ° equal opportunities • give examples of ways to put these values into practice in your day-to-day support of people with a learning disability • explain why it is important to work in a way that promotes these values.

Understanding values



Understanding values
First we need to explore what each of the following terms means in practice in your everyday work when supporting people who have learning disabilities. As you go through these explanations, notice how these values do not stand alone, for example, choice and independence and respect, individuality and dignity are closely related to each other. You can think of these values as a network of support for a person with a learning disability. Thinking point If you had to describe yourself to other people, what would you say? What are your hopes, dreams, interests and needs? Rights

Individuality

Choice

Equal opportunities

Privacy

Partnership

Independence

Key point
Individuality in the work context means that you see each person as an individual and promote their interests, aspirations and needs in all you do. Respect Dignity

▲ These are the key values that support workers should promote in working with people who have a learning disability.

Individuality
Within a few days of starting work with people with learning disabilities, it should be clear to you that everyone you work with is an individual, with their own particular likes, dislikes, strengths and personality. Services and support workers should always focus on the individuals they are working with, rather than the needs of a group of people. You and your colleagues should have the hopes, dreams, interests and needs of each person you support as a top priority in your daily work. Promoting person-centred values

provision of social care support for a person in their own home or elsewhere

services



Rights
As citizens, the rights of people with learning disabilities are protected by law, and in particular by the Human Rights Act 1998. Most people with learning disabilities who are supported by health and social care organisations are protected by the rights included in this Act. Sixteen basic human rights have been incorporated into UK law. These rights protect everyone from harm, and set out what we can say and do, as well as our right to a fair trial and other basic entitlements. rights a framework of laws that protects people from harm and guarantees them basic entitlements such as the right to respect, equality and fair trial

Human Rights Act 1998
  1.    2.    3.    4.    5.    6.    7.    8.    9.  10.  11.  12.  13.  14.  15.  16.  The right to life Prohibition of torture Prohibition of slavery and forced labour The right to liberty and security...
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