Project Management Strategy

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Introduction
Project Management is all about managing your tasks and goals with the best use of available resources within a fixed frame of time. To achieve the fixed time, the project manager would need the proper coordination of all possible inputs required to carry out the task successfully. One of such inputs is the project management maturity model which allows for improvement of project management processes and systems (Crawford, 2006). Project management maturity is the progressive development of an enterprise-wide project management approach, methodology, strategy, and decision-making process. The appropriate level of maturity will vary for each organization based on specific goals, strategies, resource capabilities, scope, and needs (Crawford, 2006).

Project management is planning and organizing effort to accomplish a project. Project management includes developing a project plan, which includes defining and confirming the project goals and objectives, identifying tasks and how goals will be achieved, quantifying the resources needed, and determining budgets and timelines for completion (PMI, 2004). It also includes the use of the Project Management Maturity Model (PMMM). The proper level of maturity to which an organization should strive is determined during a detailed assessment conducted by a professional project management consulting team. The organization has achieved full project management maturity when it has met the requirements and standards for project management effectiveness as defined by the Project Management Maturity Model (PMMM), and it is capable of demonstrating improvements such as on-time project delivery, cost reductions, organizational efficiency, and profitability (Crawford, 2006). The definition of the Project Management Maturity Model and how organizations can increase their overall productivity using the model.

When an organization achieves a full project management maturity is when it has met the requirements and standards for project management effectiveness as defined by the Project Management Maturity Model (PMMM), and is able to demonstrate an acceptable improvements such as on-time project delivery, cost reductions, organizational efficiency, and profitability (Crawford, 2006). The Project Management Maturity Model (PMMM) is defined as a formal tool to measure an organization's project management maturity (Jaafari, 2007). The PMMM affords organizations the roadmap, and the necessary processes, also known as levels to take toward project management growth and excellence (Kerzner, 2005). The levels are: •Common Language - In this level, the organization recognizes the importance of project management and the need for a good understanding of the basic knowledge on project management •Common Processes - In this level, the organization recognizes that common processes need to be defined and developed •Singular Methodology - In this level, the organization recognizes the synergistic effect of combining all corporate methodologies into a singular methodology • Benchmarking - This level contains the recognition that process improvement is necessary to maintain a competitive advantage •Continuous Improvement - In this level, the organization evaluates the information obtained through benchmarking and must decide whether the information will enhance the singular methodology (Kerzner, 2005). Organizational wide project management approach in methodology, strategy, and decision-making process are the processes in the project management maturity (Jaafari, 2007). The appropriate level of maturity as shown above is unique to each organization based on specific goals, strategies, resource capabilities, scope, and needs (Kerzner, 2005).

The importance of organizational strategy and how project management needs to link to objectives to achieve results.
To deal effectively with the factors affecting the ability of an organization to grow and...
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