Project Management: Stanford University Accelerator

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Project Management Case Study

PEP-II at Stanford
Lowell Klaisner, Chief Engineer
January, 2002

Stanford University

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Project Management Case Study

Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

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Project Management Case Study

PEP-II B Factory
Total Estimated Cost (TEC) $177 million Five Years to Construct (1993-1998) Two Rings of Magnets and Vacuum Chambers in a 2.2 km tunnel “Factory” – Requires High Up Time Replacement of an Existing Machine (PEP) Minimum of Civil Construction Uses existing infrastructure at SLAC

Collaboration of Three Laboratories
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Collaboration with IHEP in Beijing
Magnets for the Low Energy Ring

Finished On-Time and On-Budget and Met Scientific Goals

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Project Management Case Study

Project Environment

Competition between Cornell University (NSF) and Stanford University (DOE) Started shortly after the cancellation of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Started as a Presidential Initiative – President Clinton A parallel project was initiated in Japan at KEK. These projects can confirm each others data. The performance of these two projects is remarkably similar.

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Project Management Case Study

Layout of the SLAC Accelerators

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Project Management Case Study

Project Definition
A Major System Acquisition involving the modification of the SLAC linac and the Positron-Electron Project (PEP) storage ring to develop a facility to study the particle physics of high luminosity electron-positron collisions at center-of-mass energies in the 10 GeV region

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Project Management Case Study

Project Goals
To create a facility for observing collisions of electrons and positrons with sufficient luminosity, and with particles of sufficiently different energies, to measure the extent to which charge-parity (CP) conservation is violated in the decay of B-mesons. The secondary purpose of this project is to support broad-based studies of the bottom and charm quarks, the tau lepton, and two-photon interactions — all processes that require large numbers of events — by providing higher luminosity than hitherto available. Although not within the scope of the PEP-II Project, a collateral program of synchrotron radiation physics would be possible.

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Project Management Case Study

Implementation

To accomplish these goals, beams of electrons and positrons having unequal energies— roughly 3 GeV and 9 GeV— are collided so that products of the collision are moving in the laboratory rather than stationary as is the case when the two colliding beams have equal energies. To collide beams of different energies requires two storage rings, one for the 9-GeV beam (the high-energy ring) and one for the 3-GeV beam (the low-energy ring). Specialized beam optical systems were constructed at the interaction regions. To fill the storage rings with electrons and positrons, the SLAC linac was modified, beam transport lines were added in the linac enclosure, and the existing beam transport lines connecting the linac and PEP were modified.

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Project Management Case Study

PEP-II RF Section

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Project Management Case Study

Major Players
A collaboration between: SLAC – Lead Laboratory
Linac and PEP Tunnel

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)
Completed ALS similar to the LER

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)
Interaction region special processes

The primary DOE participants: Office of Energy Research (now the Office of Science) Division of High Energy Physics (DHEP) DOE Operations Office (OAK) Stanford Site Office (SSO)

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Project Management Case Study

Management Responsibilities
PEP-II PROJECT OVERSIGHT

LBL Director C. Shank

SLAC Director B. Richter

LLNL Acting Director B. Tarter

Machine Advisory...
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