Production of Edible Mushroom

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  • Topic: Volvariella volvacea, Volvariella, Edible mushroom
  • Pages : 10 (2644 words )
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  • Published : December 9, 2012
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Production of Edible Mushroom Volvariella Volvacea Using Rice Hull and Dried Water Hyacinth Leaves

A Thesis Proposal
Presented to the Faculty and Staff of
Honorato C. Perez Sr. Memorial Science High School
Mabini Ext. Cabanatuan City

In Partial Fulfillment
of the Requirements for the Subject
Research

By:
Dela Cruz, Monica Joy T.
Tome, Meggie B.
Wong, Vianca Camille P.

THE PROBLEM AND IT'S BACKGROUND

INTRODUCTION
Mushroom is the popular name for any of the larger fleshy fungi, mostly of the class Basidiomycetes. A mushroom is not a complete fungus plant instead; it is for spore producing fruiting body that develops from an extensive mass of fine threads present in the ground or the substrate on which the fungus grows. Most mushrooms, comprising many hundreds of species, are gill fungi or boletes and belong to other Agaricales. Many of this is contained in the family Agaricaceae. Sometimes the name mushroom is applied only to edible fungi, while in edible kinds-especially those with an umbrella-shaped cup-are called toadstools. At one time mushrooms generally were grown in caves, abandoned mines, and similar places that provided approximately the right temperature and humidity, but with the development of the mushroom industry most mushrooms came to be produced in specially constructed, air-conditioned buildings, where conditions favorable for growth could be more carefully controlled. Different kinds of agricultural and food wastes have been used or tried for growing various edible mushrooms in the world. These wastes are produced in big volumes during production of agricultural products every year causing lots of environmental problems in many countries. Only a very small part of these agro-wastes has been properly converted into useful or high-value products. Production of edible or medicinal mushroom is a successful example of agro-waste recycling. Nowadays, the most extensively used agro-wastes for production of edible mushrooms are wheat or rice straw, sawdust or wood chip, sugarcane bagasse, cotton waste and cotton seed hull, corn cob, rice or wheat bran, chicken or horse manure. Other green materials, such as cotton stalk and soybean straw, coffee pulp etc. have also been used or tried for growing edible mushrooms in some countries. In Taiwan, the most popular agro-waste for mushroom cultivation are rice straw, cotton waste, sawdust or wood chip, rice or wheat bran, and chicken manure. These agro-wastes with or without fertilizers or other nutrient supplements have been converted into many edible and medicinal mushrooms. Because of the high-cost of edible mushrooms in the market the researchers gained interest in producing edible mushrooms that are from plant residues to save money and to have additional income at the same time. The study will be done to prove that dried water hyacinth leaves and rice hull can produce edible mushrooms. Furthermore, this study has a propensity of producing additional source of food and can easily be grown by ordinary people at their backyards.

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM
The study entitled Production of Edible Mushroom Volvariella Volvacea Using Rice Hull and Dried Water Hyacinth Leaves aims to produce edible mushrooms using rice hull and dried water hyacinth leaves. Specifically, it attempts to answer the following questions: 1. Would rice hull and dried water hyacinth leaves produce mushrooms? 2. Can dried water hyacinth leaves and rice hull produce edible mushroom? 3. Is there a significant difference between producing edible mushroom using rice hull and water hyacinth leaves as compared to the traditional way of producing mushroom?

STATEMENT OF THE HYPOTHESIS
The following hypotheses are affirmed in null form.
1. Rice hull and dried water hyacinth leaves can’t produce mushrooms. 2. Rice hull and dried water hyacinth leaves can’t produce edible mushrooms. 3. There is no significant difference between producing edible mushroom using rice...
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