Product Placement

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Product Placement's In Movies.
Does It Work?
Product Placement is an amazing marketing tool that marketers have utilized for quite a long time. Even though some may ague that it is still an innovative and clever way to promote a product, then there are those who also argue that product placement due to its expensive price tag associated with it is not really effective; well at least not as effective as the marketers expected due to the lack of memorization of the product in the movie to the viewer; but I'll get into more of that later. But, first I would like to provide a better vision and understanding of what product placement really is. Also, why is it used by marketers? And, although at times it is deemed unsuccessful, it is mostly perceived at a successful and an effective maneuver by marketers; as long as they are able to reach their targeted segment (audience) by selecting the right movie to place their product or products in. What Is Product Placement?

Product placement is a promotional strategy that is utilized by marketers where a factual commercial product appears within a fictional or non-fictional media. The appearance of the product doesn't usually come for free nevertheless; it usually is an end result of an economical exchange between the manufactures of the product and the makers of the movie or the actors or actresses utilizing or displaying the product in the movie, or possibly even both. But when a product is featured in a production and an economical exchange does not take place, it is called a product plug. It is almost unbelievable to the average consumer how often product placements are utilized. Product placement cannot only be seen within films, but in fact product placement is also utilized in productions such as television programs (e.g. Coca Cola can be seen all over the American Idol set, and frequently the viewer can see the judges drinking the product), video games (e.g. in the Tiger Woods video game series, the consumer can dress there golfer in complete NIKE apparel), music videos (e.g. in the 50 Cent video "P.I.M.P" he is shown handling and listening to an I-Pod, this had a tremendous positive effect on sales of this product), and also books. Product placement takes place with the insertion of a brand's logo, or a favorable mentioning or appearance of a product. It is accomplished with revelation, and it is under the idea that is a natural part of the production. The majority of movie releases today consist of various product placements. Film and television placements are the most common place to witness the utilization of product placements, but as of late video games and music videos are on the rise as places where product placements are displayed. How does it work?

Although, product placements are still deemed as a fresh and innovative way for marketers to attain exposure for there products, it is something that was initiated back in the early 1950's when Gordon's Gin compensated to have Katharine Hepburn's character in the film "The African Queen" chuck loads of their product overboard. And, after that there have been numerous placements of products in thousands of films. There are many discussions of products placements, and perhaps one of the most discussed placements is the placements of Reese's Pieces in the film "E.T." This major spot in actual fact catapulted these tiny peanut butter pieces into mainstream popularity. Or for a placement that might be easier to remember due to its recentness is the placement of Red Stripe, which is a Jamaican-brewed beer in the movie "The Firm." Reported by BusinessWeek Online, Red Stripe sales witnessed an unbelievable increase of more than 50% in the United States in the first month of the movie's release. These are just some examples of the possible success that can be achieves if a marketer conducts his or her research and is able to match the placement with the audience that is viewing the production.

Now that I have...
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