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Manufacturing

the way we see it

Collaborating for Innovation
Capgemini’s 2010 Global Survey –
How to Make a Leap by Applying Collaboration
in the Innovation Process

CONTENTS
Introduction

3

Executive Summary

4

Corporate Strategy

7

Innovation Performance
R&D Collaboration

13

Customer Collaboration

16

Supplier Collaboration

18

Recommendations

2

10

21

Manufacturing

the way we see it

Introduction
Innovation has become an important
differentiator in achieving both
top-line growth and cost savings,
but this has often been restricted
by companies’ business models
and culture. Most companies have
contained innovation within their
direct circle of influence (apart from
some well-known examples such as
Procter & Gamble and Philips). But
as competition intensifies and existing
models of innovation are not enough
of a differentiator, the way to build
market share and create sustainable
top-line growth in the future will be
through a new, alternative approach –
collaborating for innovation.
Our definition of this term is “making
cooperation across organizational
boundaries inside or outside a
company’s four walls an integral part of
the innovation strategy.” This approach
taps into the wider opportunities
of working with value-chain parties
including internal partners, suppliers,
customers and even specific entities
outside the value chain.
Collaboration can take many forms:
open innovation, co-creation with
clients and suppliers, crowd sourcing,
as well as traditional partnerships
and alliances. In addition, there is a
great opportunity for various internal
business functions to cooperate within
the innovation process – particularly
the primary functions of R&D,
Marketing, Sales and Operations.
Capgemini’s first “Collaborating
for Innovation” study, published
in 2008, found that collaboration
was increasingly viewed as a critical
enabler for successful innovation.
However, significant challenges existed
in the form of resources, organization,
IT and performance metrics. Our
second biannual report takes this
position as its starting point to assess
the progress that manufacturing

Collaborating for Innovation

companies have made in further
embracing and leveraging the culture,
technologies and techniques of
collaborative innovation in today’s
economically volatile environment.
Our 2010 “Collaborating for
Innovation” study provides further
insight into the current practices of
a range of manufacturing industries,
together with recommendations for
moving towards sustainable top-line
growth by adopting a “collaborating
for innovation” approach.
Study Objectives
The research was designed to elicit
the perceptions and insights of a
range of manufacturing companies
on collaborating for innovation and
therefore to develop a comparative
view with our 2008 findings.
Companies appeared in 2008 to be
adjusting their corporate strategy,
shifting away from cost reduction to
top-line growth and accommodating
a growth-focused innovation strategy.
But how did they measure innovation
performance? What was the impact
on R&D? How successful was
collaboration with suppliers and
customers? From these questions,
we identified the key trends and
challenges, and so built a clear picture
of the way forward for innovation
within the manufacturing industries.
In this edition of “Collaborating
for Innovation,” the goal is to draw
executive attention to current strengths
and improvement opportunities
relating to the process of innovation,
focused on four overarching aspects of
the innovative company:

•
The

embedding of innovation
as a culture underpinning an
organization beyond the R&D
function and across the value chain,
including customers and suppliers.
•
The drivers and obstacles for
integrating these “external” parties
in various stages of the innovation
process.
In the interest of making...
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