Problems of Multinational Society

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to be of (British) ancestry
to be found guilty
to be commonplace
to be underrepresented
to be accepting of (traditions)
to be handicapped by smth
to be assimilated into (a culture)
to be engaged in (illegal practices )
to allow entrance
to advocate statehood
to arouse a sentiment
to accomplish a goal
to abolish slavery
to apply to all men
to adopt customs/ideas
to accommodate (refugees)
to arrive bу millions
to come on a (temporary/visitor) visa
to contend with prejudices
to соnvert to (Christianity)
to drop/rise to ... per cent
to discourage smb from (coming/voting)'
to deny smb the right
to еаse suffering
to endure (degrading conditions)
to enroll, in (college)
to extend equal privileges (to blacks)
to flee persecution
to force integration
to degrade smb's work
to get a start in (life)
to gain legal status
to grant citizenship
to grow about ... per cent
to hold a Job/position
to handle cattle
to hand down (from generation to generation)
to keep to a minimum
to keep united
to keep smb in power
to lower wages
to leave an impact on (society)
to lift restrictions
to make exemptions
to mingle and intermarry
to operate business
to permit entry
to prohibit smb from (hiring)
to provide for (severe penalties)
to remove the barriers
to sneak across the border
to span the nation
to separate by race
to see to practical needs
to sustain smb in beliefs
to take a leap
to threaten jobs
to total (... million)
estimates range from ... to ...
quota law
immigration restrictions
ceiling on immigration
numeral limitations
birth rate
infant mortality
life expectancy
population explosion
ethnic make up
commonwealth status
melting pot
salad bowl
individual identity
technological nation
policy to segregation
"great war"
Confederate states
freedom ride/riot
nomination fox president
Negro idiom
poll tax
literacy test
civil rights
nonviolent movement
sense of identification/separatedness
public facilities
commonly shared values
(ethnic) assimilation
national/religious backgrounds
ethnic pride
homeland traditions
middle/low income people
apartheid system
racial prejudice

a nation of IMMIGRANTS

In 1958, a young senator from Massachusetts published a book called A Nation of Immigrants. He was a wealthy and well-known American whose great-grandfather had come to the United States as a poor Irish immigrant. The author's name was John F.Kennedy, later the 35th President of the United States, In his book, Kennedy pointed out, "Every American who ever lived ... was, either, an immigrant himself or a descendant of immigrants". This nation of more than 244 million was built bу about 57 million immigrants and their descendants. They came from everywhere, bringing the skills, ambition and courage to convert a vast wilderness into a great industrial nation. From 1820 to 1987, about 36.7 million immigrants came from Europe, 6,2 million from Asia, and 11 million, from the Americas. What made all these people leave their homelands to come to a foreign country? Said President Kennedy, "Three strong forces— religious persecution, political oppression; and economic hardship— provided the chief motives for the mass migrations to our shores". Whatever their reasons, this influx of people who came to live in the U.S.A. represents the largest migration that the human race has ever known.

Today's American Indians call themselves native Americans, but in reality they were not natives here, Rather they were the area's earliest immigrants. They came to the Western Hemisphere from Asia more than 20,000 years ago. By the 15th century, there were 15 to 20 million Indians in the Americas. Perhaps as many as 700,000 were living within the present limits of the United States when Columbus discovered the New Worlds (the Western Hemisphere) in 1492. During the 1500s,...
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