Problems Faced by Cyclists and Pedestrian

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Problems Faced by Cyclists and Pedestrian

By | September 2010
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Pedestrian and Bicycle Planning

A Guide to Best Practices

26 August, 2010

by
Todd Litman, Robin Blair, Bill Demopoulos, Nils Eddy, Anne Fritzel, Danelle Laidlaw, Heath Maddox, Katherine Forster

Abstract

This guide covers all aspects of pedestrian and bicycle planning. It is intended for policy makers, planners and advocates who want the best current information on ways to make their communities better places for walking and cycling. It provides basic information on various planning and design concepts, and offers extensive references to help implement them. It describes general nonmotorized planning practices, how to measure and predict nonmotorized travel, how to evaluate and prioritize projects, and how to implement various programs that support nonmotorized transportation. It covers planning for paths, sidewalks, bikelanes, street improvements, road and path maintenance, road safety, personal security, universal access (including features to accommodate people with disabilities), nonmotorized traffic law enforcement, education and encouragement programs, and integration with a community’s strategic plans and various other programs. There are also appendices that provide more detailed information on planning, design and evaluation.

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Foreword

Transport planning practices must change if they are to incorporate nonmotorized modes. While walking and cycling have long been recognized as important activities, mobility and access as measured in traditional planning practices focused on motor vehicle travel. There is increasing recognition that balanced transportation choices are important to individual travelers and society overall. This guide presents best practices for nonmotorized transport planning.

Planning for nonmotorized travel can benefit your community in many ways. It can remove barriers to mobility and increase the safety and comfort of pedestrians and cyclists, broaden travel...

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