Problem Solving and Crabbe

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Jesus Lopez
Ms. Head
British Literature
Agoust 30th, 2012
“Crabbe”
Crabbe by William Bell is a journal of Franklin Crabbe, an unhappy teenager who, right before his final exams, decided to run away and leave not a trace. It takes him some time to plan it, but he gets away with it, packing up his things and driving away from his life as a spoiled, "semi-alcoholic" teenager whose every move has been planned out for him. He drives away from his privileged life and into one in the wilderness based on survival - and freedom. He shows the reader, how a young adult is withdrawn, and not only runs away physically, but also socially.

In the physical aspect, he runs away from everyone. He wants to hide in the woods, to stay away from society. He thinks that people are the main aspect of his unhappiness. On the social aspects, he smokes, drinks, and stays withdrawn from other people. One of Crabbe's main problems was his drinking (a fine example of running away socially).

He shows this when he comments, "The real problem, was that I was still having trouble getting along without my 'Pal' Silent Sam". (Silent Sam was a brand of Vodka that he preferred because it could not be detected on his breath.) Even in school he would skip Gym class to go drinking.

In school he did not have many friends, and he hated his teachers, so he would just "pretend" to pay attention. He had a master plan to "show them all" (His favorite book had the same situation and resolution).

Crabbe was a smart student, and important to his school. As a result the teachers would pardon most of his problems. An example of this was when, after he was caught drinking, the school did not punish him at all. Being so smart, he realized that "What teachers really wanted you to do, was guess what they wanted you to answer, and if you guessed correctly (not...
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