Proactive Health Strategy in Balochistan, Pakistan

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Table of Contents
1.Introduction2
2.Situation Analysis2
2.1Disease Burden2
2.2Root causes2
2.3Opportunities3
3.Vision and Mission, Principles, Goals and Objectives4
3.1Vision and mission4
3.2Principles4
3.3Goals and objectives5
4.Strategic Direction5
4.1Service Providers5
4.1.1Directorate of Health5
4.1.2Bolan Medical Complex Hospital5
4.1.3Alternative Medicine (Homeopathic College, Quetta)7
4.1.4Private Laboratory Regulatory Authority7
4.2Issues (from Clients Perspective)7
4.3Human Resources8
4.4Commodity Security and Supply Systems8
4.5Health Systems Operations8
4.6Community Involvement and Empowerment8
4.7Strengthening Partnerships8
4.8Health Information and Research9
4.9Surveillance, emergency preparedness and response9
5.Integrated Approaches and Linkages10
6.Social and political context of health10
7.Monitoring and evaluation11
8.Way forward12

HEALTH STRATEGY
1. Introduction

2. Situation Analysis
3.1 Disease Burden

The evidence of the impact of good investments and effective interventions on burden of disease and on economic indicators is becoming stronger. Nonetheless, the reality remains that Balochistan’s people face a huge burden of preventable and treatable health problems whose solutions are known, proportionately far beyond Balochistan’s government capacity to handle at the moment. The triple burden from communicable and non-communicable diseases and injury and trauma, including the social impact of these, has adversely affected development in Balochistan, which is not on track to meet the health Millennium Declaration targets and the prevailing population trends could undermine progress made. The maternal mortality rate is highest in Balochistan (600/1000) and Under Five’s Mortality Rate (U5MR) is 158 per 1000 and the Infant Mortality rate (IMR) is 104 per 1000 live births between the years from 1997 to 2001. Life expectancy is already low, is believed to be reducing due to mal-nutrition and poor health services Women and children carry a disproportionate share of Balochistan’s heavy disease burden, mostly from preventable diseases. Women carry the major responsibility for care and poor education may add to their vulnerable position.

Tuberculosis, malaria, hepatitis pose the greatest challenges. However, they should not overshadow the severe burden of other communicable diseases including pneumonia, diarrhoea and measles in children and other diseases that severely debilitate communities affected by them. These include, for example, Dracunculiasis (Guinea Worm), Cholera, Meningitis incidents continue.

The alarming rate of growth of the burden of both death and disability from non-communicable diseases in Balochistan is ever more recognized, with chronic diseases becoming ever more prevalent, linked to demographic, behavioral and social changes. Hypertension, stroke, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease and the consequences of tobacco use and illicit drugs, are growing as serious public health challenges. Injuries from violence, terrorist activities, traffic accidents and other mostly preventable causes result in death and physical disability, while the impact of mental ill-health has previously been underestimated.

Worsening protein energy and micronutrient malnutrition in many districts continues to contribute to elevated mortality, while dietary change and inactivity are factors driving the emergence of chronic diseases. Micronutrient deficiency including iron, zinc, iodine and vitamin A is widespread. Malnutrition remains a major challenge to development and child survival in Balochistan.

3.2 Root causes

The economic growth in many Balochistan countries, decline in conflicts and important strides towards democracy and good governance are all contributing to health. Other wide ranging interventions are being implemented and...
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