Pro Homine

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This is a short resume of what Pro homine is. you will find this most often in philosophy classes. I actually have many of these for different words, hels to find yourself in class when dealing with several different words but that can all sound the same or simply end differently. really their meaning are quite unique.

Pro Homine We engage in pro homine reasoning whenever we defend or accept a conclusion because it is propounded by someone whom we trust to have the correct opinion. Often, pro homine arguments have the form ‘X believes y, so I accept it too’, but a strong pro homine must (implicitly or explicitly) be an instance of the following scheme: Premise 1: X says that y. Premise 2: X is knowledgeable, trustworthy, and free of bias. Conclusion: y should be accepted. This means that when trying to decide whether an argument is a strong or weak pro homine we need to question ourselves about whether the person whose opinion is appealed to is knowledgeable, trustworthy, and free of bias. In proposing pro homine reasoning we take our past experience of certain individuals as intelligent and honest as good grounds for accepting their opinions now and in the future. So if they have in the past demonstrated that they do or do not have a grasp of the difference between weak and strong arguments then this is evidence to consider when they provide further pro homine reasoning.

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