Prison Life

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Private prisons could create more jobs within local communities, strengthening the local economy. The challenge can come in getting approval to build those prisons near communities or in outlying rural areas because of overall financial fears of ongoing costs to run the facility.

First, the cost to the taxpayer of operating prisons is a con associated with prison operations. Many U.S. prisons are state-funded, which means the general taxpayer pays to care for prisoners. While prisoners may have jobs within the prison, the taxable contribution is often low. Taxpayers contribute to the care of prisoners through their paychecks and working hard daily while the prisoner is fed and provided with a place to sleep. Criminals locked away in prison are not having a good time, but they are living on the hard work of law-abiding citizens.

In addition, prisoners sometimes lose family connections, making this a con of prisons. Whether family members are not allowed to visit because of their age or refuse to visit due to personal reasons, prisoners may lose the family ties which existed before they were imprisoned. Some prisons may provide a halfway house or a work program for released prisoners, but most will not help a prisoner when he finally walks out the front door. Family ties are essential if a reformed criminal hopes to re-assimilate into the working world. Family members are the most likely members of society to give prisoners a place to live and a second chance.

In conclusion the effect prison has on families is a con of prison life. Families may fall apart while the prisoner is serving time, or begin to argue over matters better left alone. Witnessing a family member go to prison is stressful on family members, and old arguments may arise to avoid the real feelings regarding the imprisonment. The imprisoned family member may have possessed the highest income within the...
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