President Jackson on the Twenty Dollar Bill

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Jackson on the Twenty Dollar Bill
Taylor Alton, 7th 11/13/11

I do not believe that President Jackson should be on the twenty dollar bill. He was not a man of good; all he cared about was pleasing himself and making other people believe he was doing good; manipulating them. Andrew Jackson was only concerned with keeping the union together. If he could get people to see that he could keep the states one nation then he would gain fame. I find this very ironic, he hated paper money and actually preferred coins, and people want him to be on the twenty dollar bill. The last reason I don’t want him on the twenty dollar bill is because of the way he treated the slaves and slavery in itself. Why should we put a man on money that does not deserve it? Andrew Jackson was a one man show unless it came to putting on a fake smile to “win” over his followers support. If something that he saw posed as a threat to his ideas then it was no good. Take cooperation’s or businesses for example, Andrew Jackson and most of his Democratic followers feared the growing economic and political power exercised by some corporations. Their ability to amass wealth, through banking and manufacturing operations, and to influence and even coerce individual citizens, posed a threat to the Jeffersonian ideals that Jackson held dear. So once again, those companies threatened his power and he did not like that. Andrew Jackson believed that the Second Bank of the United States was unconstitutional and that it posed a serious threat to the American economy and its democratic political institutions. Though its charter was not set to expire until 1836, BUS (Bank of the U.S.) president...
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