Preservation of Medicinal Plants

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TITLE OF THE PAPER: SARPAKAVU PROTECTION ACT [CONSERVATION OF MEDICINAL PLANTS]

AUTHORS: MS RESHMA R
MR VISWESH VISWANATH

DESIGNATION : STUDENT

DEPARTMENT : MBA

INSTITUTE: SAINTGITS INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT
PATHAMUTTOM.P.O
KOTTAYAM
686532

TELEPHONE :09544433228, 09567292623

EMAIL ID : reshmapillai.r@gmail.com
viswesh.viswanath@gmail.com

SARPAKAVU PROTECTION ACT [ CONSERVATION OF MEDICILNAL PLANTS]

Ms RESHMA R
Mr VISWESH VISWANATH

ABSTRACT

The sacred groves of Kerala are the remnants of evergreen forest patches, protected and conserved based on religious beliefs and a great repository of many endemic, endangered and economically important plant species. The study reports revealed that floristic diversity indices of the sacred groves of Kerala are equal or nearly equal to the forests of the Western Ghats. It is also revealed that these isolated patches are self-sustainable ecosystems function as a bio-resource centre and closed system for the nutrient and water cycles for the nearby areas.

Sarpa Kavu (meaning Abode of the Snake God) is a small traditional forest seen in Kerala state of South India. This untouched small forest usually have idols of Naga Devatas and Naga Devas (snake gods) and people would worship them. This was part of Nagaaradhana (snake worship) which was prevalent among Keralites during past centuries. It has been practised by Nairs, Ezhavas, Arayas and many other tribal, non-tribal and costal communities all over Malabar Cost practises serpent worship in south India.

The Mannarasala nagaraja temple is located in Alappy district. The total land comes around 8 acres and it is the personal property of Mannarasala tharavadu. The temple trust gives maximum care and protections for the medicinal plants in the sarpakavu.They have taken an initiative to plant and grow medicinal plants in the appoppan kavu area of Mannarasala temple.

Protection of the environment and life supporting systems are interwoven with conservation of biological diversity. Sacred groves represent this all-embracing concept and practice of ancient Indian way of in situ conservation of genetic diversity. Sacred groves, in general act as a nursery and store house of many of the local ayurvedic, tribal and folk medicines. Fruits of Artocarpus, Syzygium, Salacia, Phyllanthus, Mangifera, Buchanania, Carissa, Garcinia etc. are eaten by birds and animals (mostly nocturnals) in the sacred groves.

The really protected sacred groves will provide a real picture of the bio diversity of earth. As a result of high conservation and biodiversity values held in sacred groves. increasing attention is being paid to their potential as a tool and a model for biodiversity conservation. Preservation of sacred groves is an important necessity in this era of dwindling forest cover; but the problem is difficult to tackle, as the number of sacred groves is many and the agencies in charge of them are diverse. Hence a common approach in all cases may not be feasible. SARPAKAVU PROTECTION ACT [ CONSERVATION OF MEDICILNAL PLANTS]

Ms. RESHMA R
Mr. VISWESH VISWANATH

INTRODUCTION

Sarpa Kavu (meaning Abode of the Snake God) is a small traditional forest seen in Kerala state of South India. This untouched small forest usually have idols of Naga Devatas and Naga Devas (snake gods) and people would worship them. This was part of Nagaaradhana (snake worship) which was prevalent among Keralites during past centuries. It has been practised by Nairs, Ezhavas, Arayas and many other tribal, non-tribal and costal communities all over Malabar Cost practises serpent worship in south India.

Sarpakavu or Sacred grove symbolizes an effort to conserve biodiversity or ethnic diversity traditionally. In India, the sacred groves are found all over the country and...
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