Presentation: Gentrification

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  • Topic: Affordable housing, African American, Public housing
  • Pages : 12 (3800 words )
  • Download(s) : 110
  • Published : November 9, 2011
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TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION …………………………………………………………………………………………1

REVITALIZATION……………………………………………………………………………………………...2

SOCIAL ISSUES………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3

HOUSING..................................................................................................................................................5

ATLANTA IN THE 1980’S..........................................................................................................................

ATLANTA IN THE 1990’S..........................................................................................................................

HOUSING AUTHORITY DEMOLITIONS................................................................................................

NEW TENSIONS.............................................................................................................................................

GENTRIFICATION POLICY EVOLVES...................................................................................................

CHANGES IN THE HOUSING MARKET.................................................................................................

INCLUSIONARY ZONING...........................................................................................................................

The growth of cities in the United States in the second half of the 20th century changed the dynamics of cities in America. Cities were once known as manufacturing centers , but started to transform into urban centers. The City of Atlanta is a prime example of growth and renovation. Gentrification is the practice of changing the face of a neighborhood by the replacement of poor residents with residents of a higher income. Jude Glass first used the term Gentrification in 1964 referring to the displacement of the working class by middle class individuals in London. Today, the term is still relevant in its description and process, but has evolved to include a myriad of complicated variables that cloud the underlying problem of displacement. While many benefit from “new” neighborhoods, there is a flip side. The question is, can gentrification lead to a long-term stable or greater volatility due to conflicts arising from the socioeconomic differences between whites, blacks, and other minorities in Atlanta? And how are we insuring that displaced residents have adequate and suitable housing? INTRODUCTION

Displacement of residents in gentrifying neighborhoods is troubling (Berry 1985). Displacement due to gentrification in central city neighborhoods has been shown to affect the elderly and possibly the poor. The problem with the focus of gentrification is that it is difficult to prove. The problems are centered on not being able to track residents and finding out there reasons for moving (Cameron 1992). Gentrification produces both positive and negative realities for residents. The test for lawmakers and city planners is making sure revitalization is beneficial to ALL members in a community. Furthermore, the fall-out from gentrification – higher rent, needs to be addressed or mitigated. Revitalization can erase the historicity of certain areas. When revitalization is introduced into a neighborhood, conflict between proponents and current residents ensue. This happens because both parties view change differently and the end result totally disregards the displaced inhabitants. Whether gentrification affects large or small-scale communities, city officials need to understand the negativity involved and act on it. Most of the research available advises that gentrification only happens in a limited number of American Communities. But even though the number of communities affected is limited, the impact to the surrounding communities can be substantial (Bourne 1993).

ATLANTA IN THE 1980’S
Gentrification...
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