Present Perfect Continuous Timeline - Assignment

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  • Topic: Grammatical aspect, Perfect aspect, Time
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Present Perfect Continuous Timeline

 Teaching Present perfect continuous
  I usually draw a time line on the board about something I started doing in the past and on the other end I write now, then I present the sentence. for example: I started working here in 2004, I am working here now.

I have been working here for 2 years.
Then I have the students try to form sentences using the structure."  Salvador 
  Any effective exercise which emphasises the time elapsed between the action starting and continuing in the present. I use a clock which can be easily adjusted. On the board I write: It's 4pm now - cooking

I set the time on the clock to 2pm and say:
I started cooking at this time, how long have I been cooking? I use as many examples of verb and time settings as I think necessary. This can also incorporate the functions of 'since' (point in time in the past) and 'for' (length of time from beginning to continuation."  Andrew 

  I tried an enjoyable activity which I can recommend. Put the students in a group and tell them to form a circle. They will make guesses about the student on their left: "I think you have been wearing that bracelet for 1 week." 

and the student answers:
"No, I have been wearing it for 2 days." and so on. 
You can also encourage them to use "how long..." questions. Try it and let me know your ideas :)"  Hande 
  Show pictures of people to students and get them to think of ideas of what that person has been doing. The students need to form sentences using the present perfect continuous." Sarah 
  You can also try the song In the shadows - by the Rasmus." Ofelya 
  I introduce the present perfect continuous with a conversation, between two characters students like: famous people, cartoon characters, etc. Then I ask some questions about the conversation (e.g. How long has Harry Potter been playing quidditch? Ss infer the rules by themselves... then we can open their books and look at the rule in detail." Roxana 

  I show two pictures. Pic 1 shows John walking to school and pic 2 shows Matthew walking to school but he started at 7.30am and at 8.30 he has not yet reached school. Then I say... "Matthew has been walking to school for an hour". That means he started walking in the past and has not reached school in the present. Whereas in pic 1 John is going to school and the time is not mentioned. Right now he is walking. So we use only present continuous. I think this way of comparing and contrasting helps the students.  G Indira 

The Present Perfect Continuous TenseThe present perfect continuous tense is often used (with for or since) to describe how long something has been happening up to now.Present Perfect Continuous TimelineFor example:-Q) How long have you been studying English?"  A) I've been studying English for four years." 

Note - You can just say "For four years." 
Q) How long have you been living in Germany?
A) I've been living here since 1998.
Note - You can just say "Since 1998".The present perfect continuous is also used to refer to an event that may or may not be finished when it's effect can be seen now.For example:-Look! It's been snowing.  Note - It's not necessarily snowing now but you can see the effect (the snow on the ground).You should also use the present perfect continuous when talking about how long you have been doing your current job or working on unfinished projects:-For example:-I have been working at BT for three years.  We have been exporting to China since 1999.How do we make the Present Perfect Continuous Tense?The structure of the present perfect continuous tense is: subject| +| auxiliary verb| +| auxiliary verb| +| main verb|  |  | have

has|  | been|  | base + ing|
Here are some examples of the present perfect continuous tense:  | subject| auxiliary verb|  | auxiliary verb| main verb|  | +| I| have|  | been| waiting| for one hour.|
+| You| have|  | been| talking| too much.|
-| It| has| not| been...
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