Premacy of Practice

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Amber Reichel
Appiah Rough Draft

Cosmopolitism is a set of moral standards for living in a global world. What will really bring the people of the world together is what Appiah calls the "Primacy of Practice." If you are exposed to a new thing long enough, it becomes natural. In the “The Primacy of Practice”, Appiah talks a lot about how values can be recognized and accepted, without having to have to agree with the explanations for why people believe those values. Practice can make one realize or understand why others perform such practices, but this can sometimes be dangerous, risky, or controversial in society when those practices are considered abhorrent.

Appiah gives an examples stating that in places where a generation ago homosexuals were social outcasts and homosexual acts were illegal, lesbian and gay couples are increasingly being recognized by families, by society, and by the law”. People’s religion and the society in general have arguments, for and against it, and today, there are more people who support it more than in the past. Another example of this Primacy of Practice change is the civil rights and women's movements in the United States. The best tools today which help us achieve these new levels of social practice are various medias such as the news, magazines, and even social networking sites such as facebook. These things create the world to be more open to the new ideas brought before us everyday and give people from various cultures a chance to connect, interact, and share new ideas with each other.

Many people are good at becoming accustomed to new things and are open to new beliefs as well. “We can live together without agreeing on what the values are that make it good to live together,” he writes. “We can agree about what to do in most cases, without agreeing about why it is right.
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