Power of Emotional Branding

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The Power Of Emotional Branding

Scope – This paper attempts to define emotional branding & techniques used to achieve the same

“People spend money when and where they feel good” – Walt Disney

The word brand is derived from Old English meaning “burning stick” (and ultimately from the Indo-European word meaning “to be hot”). Livestock branding was used by the ancient Egyptians as early as 2700 BC as a theft deterrent, as stolen animals could then be readily identifiable.

A Brand is something that encapsulates the key features of the product – its image, usage and price – in an easily recognizable and interesting form. From the consumer viewpoint, the brand is a signal of quality. Their positive experience with brands helps establish both a preference for the brand as well as an emotional attachment. Advertisers today do not advertise by simply selling a product to consumers but rather to sell a lifestyle and an identity through their products. The emotional branding falls in the zone of pull strategy. Emotional branding targets pain points like ladies & children. Brands enable their owners to enjoy sustainable competitive advantages—and therefore superior financial performance.

We can consider that as per the Maslow’s pyramid different people have same needs at different stages of their life. So the emotional branding is done depending upon the product and the niche in which it has positioned it self. Like for a trendy ladies bicycle you would not take a muscle man for emotional branding rather the emotions will be focused on a pleasing looking young lady with whom the other girls can identify themselves with .Here we would like to say that the characters shown in the emotional branding should not always be the end users , it could be aimed at the decision makers. Like for example a baby shown in the advertisement is a very strong catalyst for mothers who are the decision makers ,to purchase the product.

When for emotional branding if the organization shows a player or is showing a celebrity it wants to state the message that its product also has in it the energy, skills or looks like the brand ambassador.

For experiential or credence goods, product quality is often difficult to discern even after consumption, and you might need extensive experience before arriving at such an assessment. After all, you do not drive a car for a week and become convinced of its overall reliability! In such cases, the consumer’s brand perceptions of intangibles such as implied reliability; quality and image of product innovation and expertise play a critical role in determining customer loyalty. Experience with a brand lowers perceived risk and enhances loyalty. Lack of experience with a product leads to higher risk perceptions reducing the likelihood of that option being tried by consumers. Thus, in “experience” goods consumer often rely on the sellers’ expertise. In this case the sellers brand associations lead the consumer’s choice. Recently Toyota appointed Aamir Khan as their Brand ambassador for their Innova model , the link is perfect ness off all features between both.

Products confirm to some specifications, comply with some tolerance range and confirm to some quality standards. The product-features get translated to functional value propositions (FVP) for the customer. The better functional value proposition could be also be offered by offering similar functionalities at lesser price. Thus, the products offering just functional value proposition are quite vulnerable.

A better safeguard is to offer the customer an emotional reason to purchase over and above the functional one. Let us call it Emotional Value Proposition (EVP) The emotional reason is difficult to be replicated by the competitor, hence, even of the competitor matches the FVP, EVP creates the immunity. The customer starts seeing a definite benefit in associating with it. Successful brands own the emotions in the customers mind. The customers...
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