Poverty in Indonesia

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PAPER WORK:
POVERTY IN INDONESIA

By:
Nur Shahida Binti Ramli011211133128

PANCASILA AND CIVICS EDUCATION
INTERNATIONAL CLASS PROGRAM
FACULTY OF MEDICINE AIRLANGGA UNIVERSITY
2012
ABSTRACT

Indonesia is said to be the forth largest nation where the statistic of poverty among the people is relatively high. Poverty is defines as living without basic necessities like clean water, proper nutrition, healthcare, education, clothing and shelter. The statistics of poverty in Indonesia can be seen in the study held by the Central Bureau of Statistic or can be said as Badan Pusat Statistik (BPS). In the statistic, it states that the percentage of poverty in rural areas is much higher than urban area. But, however there is migration of poor to near-poor, but there also people who actually not poor migrate to near-poor. It can be said that, poverty in Indonesia is hard to overcome. This is due to several factors such as high rate of population growth and corruption happens in Indonesia. To overcome this, we have to stand for the rights of citizens. It can be by the help of human rights and the system of democracy. United Nations Human Rights defines human rights as the rights to all human beings in the world, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, religion, language, or any other status. While democracy is defines as a rule of people by the people where people have the power to rule in the national government. There are two articles of human rights that advocate for the right of the poor, which are article 25 and 28. The system of democracy can helps by the power of freedom to speak and voice their opinion.

Keyword : Poverty, Indonesia, Human Rights, Democracy

1.0 INSPIRATION STATEMENT

I write this article is the inspiration I got through by looking at the life experienced by people in Indonesia. We can see that poverty has always struck at major cities like Jakarta and Surabaya. For example, we can see in terms of riverside housing occupied by the poor, the situation is very sad. Some even do not have a place to live and they live on the streets or narrow alleys. Furthermore, their clothing also unmanageable, looks dirty and torn out. Young children that should get early education but in reality those children help their parents to earn a living. We can even see the children playing around in a garbage area to find food scraps. There's also asking for alms at the houses or the streets. In addition, we can see more of the poor people selling newspapers and snacks from cars to cars along the road. There are also older people who sell food from house to house with carriages. All of these occupation is the only way for them to meets their needs. Therefore, I present this article to discuss about the poverty that struck the Indonesian population.

2.0 INTRODUCTION

What is “poverty”? John Maxwell (2007) used the term of poverty to describe the limitations of income poverty and consumption, degree of backwardness and human dignity, social exclusion, a state suffering from illness, lack of expertise and physical malfunction to work, vulnerability (in dealing with political and economic changes), the lack of sustainability of life resources, basic needs, and relative deprivation. The term also can be define as living without basic necessities like clean water, proper nutrition, healthcare, education, clothing and shelter. Poverty can be divided into three terms: absolute poverty, relative poverty and cultural poverty. A person classified as poor if the absolute income results were below the poverty line, it is not sufficient to meet the minimum needs of life: food, clothing, health, housing, education. Someone, who has actually classified as relatively poor live above the poverty line, but still below the capabilities of the surrounding community. Being poor is closely related to the cultural attitude of a person or group...
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