Poverty and Pollution

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POVERTY and POLLUTION
NANCY J. KREPPS
PROFESSOR CHESTER GALLOWAY
BUS3
03/02/2013

Poverty is defined as the state or condition of having little or no money, goods, or means of support; condition of being poor; deficiency of necessary or desirable, ingredients, qualities, scantiness; insufficiency. (www.dictionary.com) There are many people in our country and other countries that suffer from this condition. The third world countries seem to bear the brunt of this condition. Pollution is defined as the introduction of harmful substances or products into the environment. (www.dictionary.com) Our country and other countries are responsible for the pollution of the environment all over the world. Emissions from companies that have gone to the third world countries have contributed to the pollution problem. We are all responsible. How are poverty and pollution connected? Who is truly responsible for this, where are the most polluted and poverty stricken places, and what can we do about it? The answers are not easy to find. No one wants to take responsibility for what is happening to our earth. No one wants to put the money that they make by polluting the earth to clean up the earth. It is just not the businesses that cause the pollution. Some of the third world countries have had a problem with this before they moved into the area. They should take responsibility also. There are many ethical implications of businesses polluting in a third world country. Businesses feel that they can pollute the third world countries because the people there are poor and the country is under developed. Third world countries do not have the pollution regulations like the countries in the west, such as our country. This allows companies to build manufacturing plants, such as the automobile industry in whatever third world country they decide on and pay that government privilege fees for being there. There have been companies in the US that have been give tax breaks to move to another country to make their wares. Emissions from the automobile industry and many others make it very hard for people in the third world countries to breathe clean air and have clean, drinkable water. It is not just the coal dust and fly ash polluting the air and making it hard to breathe, it is also the chemical makeup of these pollutants that cause other illnesses such as cancer. Birth defects, including body deformities are the major concern of some of these third world nations. Other ethical implications are the toxins that are dumped into the waterways, making it impossible for the residents of the area to have drinkable water. Some people have the opinion that it is ok to pollute the poverty stricken areas of the third worlds, by saying that it is based on the savage principle of survival of the fittest. (www.cato.org) The governments in these third world countries make a decision if money is more important that the clean air and water for the residents of that country. There are those that believe that pollution is the price we pay for progress. How valuable is human life? People everywhere are worth the same, and all of us are priceless and cannot be replaced. It has been stated that the thirds world countries and their inhabitants are responsible for the pollution in their countries and are spreading their brown clouds of pollution to the western world. Businesses have the right to produce their products to make their products. They go to third world countries because the labor there is cheaper than here in the US. Because of the progress of these businesses and the lack of governmental environmental regulations pollution is a great problem in the third world countries. For instance, in China’s Shanxi Province, emissions from vehicles and industry have created an atmosphere where people

literally choke on coal dust. (www.abc.net) There must be some way for them to do business and not...
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