Positive Discipline

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Positive Discipline

Parents who love their children have a responsibility to guide, love, teach and discipline them towards appropriate behavior. Barakat and Clark (2007) say that negative actions such as spanking can interfere with a child’s healthy development. For example: spanking a child for inappropriate behavior teaches them, that physical force is appropriate in disciplining bad behavior. Encouraging good behavior can lessen the time it takes to correct him, or her for mistakes. Positive discipline can have nurturing benefits towards the child, such as building a strong self-esteem, self-control, and responsibility in a child’s future (Barakat & Clark, 2007).

Teaching a child to be responsible shows them organization skills as well as consequences when a task is not done. A child who is taught to clean up their mess will show skills of cleanliness, and organization to know where things belong (Barakat & Clark, 2007). Knowing where toys, books, and other items go prevents frustration in looking for them. However, if the child does not do what they are told to do, let them know that there are consequences. Children who are not following through show a good chance that the parent is not showing encouragement. Encouragement shows the child they are being acknowledged for their accomplishments. Children need to be encouraged like when a parent encourages a baby to walk. Barakat and Clark (2007) believed that allowing children to experience the consequences of their behavior is also called learning the hard way. If a child breaks or makes a mess of something that was not theirs, they need to help in fixing it or in cleaning the mess up. If a child causes distress to another child in that matter, then the child needs to find a way in relieve the other child. This shows healthy development in what is right and wrong.

Self-control teaches a child to have patience and make right choices. According to Barak and Clark (2007) a child’s misbehavior is impossible to avoid but showing them in a positive way that one is interested show that he, or she is important. Teaching the child to be calm in sticky situations shows them patience, and lets them know that tantrums will get them nowhere, which creates self-control (Barak & Clark, 2007). A child who has high self-esteem shows that they are valuable, and will make positive choices throughout their life. For example: A child who grows up in a positive environment will have good grades in school, and will choose to attend college. Therefore, effective parenting skills help build a strong child and adult in the later years (Barakat & Clark, 2007). Nurturing them shows them confidence in what one is teaching them is the right way.

Acknowledging children for their good behavior small or little show healthy development. Barakat and Clark (2007) believe our children learn to love themselves by the way we treat them. As parents its important to make our children feel good about themselves to show them how special they are. According to Howard (1996) reinforcement of desired behavior can be social, by using smiles, touches, hugs, comments, or praise, or tangible, by using points, tokens, stickers, toys, food, or other rewards. The goal is for the child to feel proud and satisfied in acting correctly.

To establish good behavior a parent has to provide positive reinforcement with appropriate punishment. Howard (1996) states that, a child who misbehaves should be followed with unpleasant consequences, such as time out, taking away favorite toys, not allowed to watch TV and so on (Howard, 1996). Howard (1996) stated that “ Time out has been shown to be effective when the child has been placed in a chair, a room, the bathroom, or when the opportunity for reinforcement is removed, such as by removing the object of dispute or having the mother leave the room, or stay but ignore the child completely’” (para 27). The consistent use of time out each time a child breaks a rule, should...
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