Positive Behavior Interventions

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Positive Behavior Interventions

Managing classroom behavior is one of the tasks most challenging for beginning teachers and even some veteran teachers. A national survey revealed that 20% of first- year teachers did not feel adequately prepared to maintain order and discipline in their classroom (Faul, Stepensky & Simonsen, 2011). I struggle with controlling individuals’ behavior that interrupts the other students learning. A research was designed to show how a specific management strategy helped decrease inappropriate behavior and increase appropriate behavior. The research combined with my experience in the classroom helped me come to the conclusion of how to promote positive behavior.

The study was looking at the effects of teachers prompting appropriate behavior on the off task behavior of two middle school students. Prompts are used as reminders and they can be verbal, visual, gestural, and physical but they should be specific and frequent for them to be effective. The study took place in an urban middle school with 1000 students across grades 5-8. The two participants in the study was Owen, an 11 year old male in the fifth grade and Tom, a 12 year old male in sixth grade. They were in general education classes and both were academically able to complete the work when not engaging in off task behaviors. Their off task behaviors included getting out of their seat, talking out, making disruptive noises, and talking to peers. Data was collected in the classes where problem behaviors were most likely to occur for each student. The dependent variable in the research was direct observation to document students’ on-and off-task behavior and the independent variable is the verbal prompt addressed to each student. The verbal prompt was given only one time at the beginning of class and was alternated every other day and it was “Be respectful, be responsible, and have pride. Do your best!” The results showed that both students engaged in less off-task...
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