Porter Five Forces

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In today's dynamic and competitive business environment, survival, growth and profitability are the essence goals of all industries. Nowadays, Porter's Five Forces model is currently being adopted as the powerful management tool of choice by many organizations. The essence of this model is that it can help senior managers to make right decision and build and sustain competitive advantages in the organization level. This document presents the overview approach of Porter¡¦s five forces framework across organizations. And critically evaluation of porter¡¦s five forces model mainly focused on identifying the benefits and limitations of it and exploring some perceived issues or problems regarding implementation. Finally the analysis of the five competitive forces of Orange Juice From Concentrate industry in KSA is concluded in the last section of this document. 2.0MICHAEL PORTER¡¦S FIVE FORCES

2.1Porter¡¦s Five Forces Model
The economic structure of an industry is not an accident. Its complexities are the result of long-term social trends and economic forces. But its effects on business managers are immediate because it determines the competitive rules and strategies managers are likely to use. Michael Porter has identified five forces that are widely used to assess the structure and competition of any industry (Anonymous. Module MN 7037/D. Strategic Marketing Management). Fig 1 summarizes Porter¡¦s five forces:

Figure 1 Porter's five forces source: Module MN 7037/D. Strategic Marketing Management Together, the strength of the five forces determines the profit potential in an industry by influencing the prices, costs, and required investments of businesses¡Xthe elements of return on investment. Stronger forces are associated with a more challenging business environment (Backer, Michael. J. Marketing Strategy & Management). 2.1.1Power of Suppliers

Any business requires inputs¡Xlabour, parts, raw materials, and services. The cost of company¡¦s inputs can have a significant effect on its profitability. Whether the strength of suppliers represents a weak or a strong force hinges on the amount of bargaining power they can exert and, ultimately, on how they can influence the terms and conditions of transactions in their favour. Suppliers would prefer to sell to customers at the highest price possible or provide customers with no more services than necessary. If the force is weak, then customers may be able to negotiate a favourable business deal for themselves. Conversely, if the force is strong, then customers are in a weak position and may have to pay a higher price or accept a lower level of quality or service (Porter, Michael E., Competitive Strategy). Suppliers have the most power when:

„«Industry is dominated by a few suppliers.
„«Suppliers are more concentrated than the buyers.
„«No substitutes.
„«Supplier has more important customers.
„«Supplier¡¦s input is critical.
„«Differentiated product.
„«High switching cost.
„«Potential forward integration (Porter, Michael E., Competitive Strategy). 2.1.2Power of Buyers
The power of buyers describes the effect that customers have on the profitability of suppliers¡¦ business. The transaction between the seller and the buyer creates value for both parties. But if buyers (who may be distributors, consumers, or other manufacturers) have more economic power, suppliers¡¦ ability to capture a high proportion of the value created will decrease, and they will earn lower profits (Porter, Michael E., Competitive Strategy). Buyers have the most power when:

„«Buyers are more concentrated than the suppliers.
„«Standardized or undifferentiated products.
„«Low switching cost.
„«Low profit margins.
„«Potential backward integration (Porter, Michael E., Competitive Strategy). 2.1.3Threat of New Entrants
The threat of new entrants is the possibility that new firms will enter the industry. New entrants bring a desire to gain market share and often...
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