Population and Prostitution

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A. Pollution

1.1 Sources of Pollution
1.2 Classification of Pollution
1.3 Effects on health and economics
1.4 Ways on how to reduce pollution

B. Prostitution

1.4.1Prostitution as positive function
1.4.2Prostitution as negative function
1.4.3Prostitution as Career
1.5. Types of Prostitution
1.6 Causes and Effects of Prostitution
1.7 Characteristics of Prostitution
1.8. Argument in Favour of Legalizing Prostitution


Pollution is the introduction of contaminants into a natural environment that causes instability, disorder, harm or discomfort to the ecosystem physical systems or living organisms.

Pollution can take the form of chemical substances or energy, such as noise, heat, or light.

Pollutants, the elements of pollution, can be foreign substances or energies, or naturally occurring; when naturally occurring, they are considered contaminants when they exceed natural levels.

Pollution is often classed as point source or nonpoint source pollution.

Sources of Pollution
1. Anthropogenic (Human Caused) Sources of Pollution
Agricultural - comprises wastes, emissions, and discharges arising from farming activities. Industrial - pollution which can be directly linked with industry, in contrast to other pollution sources. This form of pollution is one of the leading causes of pollution worldwide. Transport (Car, Ship, Airplane)

2. Natural Sources of Pollution
Volcanic eruptions - An eruption begins when pressure on a magma chamber forces magma up through the conduit and out the volcano's vents. When the magma chamber has been completely filled, the type of eruption partly depends on the amount of gases and silica in the magma. The amount of silica determines how sticky (level of viscosity) the magma is and water provides the explosive potential of steams. Dust storms - As the force of wind passing over loosely held particles increases, particles of sand first start to vibrate, then to saltate ("leap"). As they repeatedly strike the ground, they loosen and break off smaller particles of dust which then begin to travel in suspension.

Other sources:
Chemical - is when certain compounds are left or disposed of in the environment. The chemicals disrupt the processes of the ecosystem. Light - Its sources include building exterior and interior lighting, advertising, commercial properties, offices, factories, streetlights, and illuminated sporting venues. Noise - The source of most outdoor noise worldwide is mainly construction and transportation systems, including motor vehicle noise, aircraft noise and rail noise. Poor urban planning may give rise to noise pollution, since side-by-side industrial and residential buildings can result in noise pollution in the residential area. Visual - the term given to unattractive and man-made visual elements of a vista, a landscape, or any other thing that a person does not feel comfortable to look at. Visual pollution is an aesthetic issue, referring to the impacts of pollution that impair one's ability to enjoy a vista or view. Personal pollution -is the contamination of one's body and lifestyle with detrimental actions. Radioactive (contamination)- is one of the types of pollution that is rare but extremely detrimental, even deadly, when it occurs. Because of its intensity and the difficulty of reversing damage, there are strict government regulations to control radioactive pollution. Thermal -is excess heat that creates undesirable effects over long periods of time. The earth has a natural thermal cycle, but excessive temperature increases can be considered a rare type of pollution with long term effects. Many types of thermal pollution are confined to areas near their source, but multiple sources can have wider impacts over a greater geographic area.


Air pollution
Air Pollution is defined as any contamination of the atmosphere...
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