Popularity of Poker

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  • Topic: Poker, Chris Moneymaker, World Series of Poker
  • Pages : 10 (2394 words )
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  • Published : March 9, 2013
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M O D U L E U N I T A S S I G N M E N T
In
Methods of Regional and EU Analysis
Title
„Popularity of Poker”

Submitted by
Name: Rosen Apostolov
Faculty Number: 125782
[Name of the Master Program]European studies and Regional Cooperation

Ruse,
2012

Contents
1.Introduction2
2.The Poker Boom3
3.World Series of Poker and European Poker Tour Research4
4.Questionnaire and analysis6
5.Conclusion12

1. Introduction
Poker is a family of card games involving betting and individualistic play whereby the winner is determined by the ranks and combinations of their cards, some of which remain hidden until the end of the game. Poker games vary in the number of cards dealt, the number of shared or "community" cards and the number of cards that remain hidden. The betting procedures vary among different poker games in such ways as betting limits and splitting the pot between a high hand and a low hand. In most modern poker games, the first round of betting begins with one of the players making some form of a forced bet (the ante). In standard poker, each player is betting that the hand he or she has will be the highest ranked. The action then proceeds clockwise around the table and each player in turn must either match the maximum previous bet or fold, losing the amount bet so far and all further interest in the hand. A player who matches a bet may also "raise," or increase the bet. The betting round ends when all players have either matched the last bet or folded. If all but one player fold on any round, then the remaining player collects the pot and may choose to show or conceal their hand. If more than one player remains in contention after the final betting round, the hands are revealed and the player with the winning hand takes the pot. With the exception of initial forced bets, money is only placed into the pot voluntarily by a player who, at least in theory, rationally believes the bet has positive expected value. Thus, while the outcome of any particular hand significantly involves chance, the long-run expectations of the players are determined by their actions chosen on the basis of probability, psychology and game theory.

Poker has gained in popularity since the beginning of the twentieth century, and has gone from being primarily a recreational activity confined to small groups of mostly male enthusiasts, to a widely popular spectator activity with international audiences and multi-million dollar tournament prizes. 2. The Poker Boom

The term “Poker Boom” is described to be the period of time between 2003 and 2006, when the phenomenon of online poker was brought to existence and poker (particularly No Limit Texas Hold’ Em) became extremely popular. Two specific 2003 triggers completed the launch of the poker boom. In the spring of 2003, the World Poker Tour's first season debuted on the Travel Channel on American cable television. The impact of the boom was escalated in May, 2003, when amateur Chris Moneymaker won the 2003 WSOP Main Event. Moneymaker won his seat via a $39 satellite tournament on the PokerStars online poker room. Moneymaker was one of 839 entrants in the 2003 event, an increase of roughly 200 players from 2002 and almost doubling the 393 competitors that played in 1999. By the very next year, the field in the 2004 Main Event swelled by more than 1700 (over 200%), to 2576 players. By the 2006 Main Event, this number had grown to 8773 competitors - nearly a 1300% increase versus the last 2002 pre-boom Main Event. Chris Moneymaker and Pokerstars are the two symbols that had a huge impact on the popularization of the game.

3. WSOP and EPT Research
WSOP stands for World Series of Poker and is in fact a period of time when a series of poker tournaments are being held annually in Las Vegas. It is extremely popular in the USA, but the attendance list includes...
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