Pop and Protest

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In history, there have been many shifts in lifestyle, reform and in music. What has not changed was the way music affected these changes. Although there may be many different interpretations for these works of art, the truth behind them lies with the artist. There are many ways music can affect an individuals. Most of these feelings are personal and self-centered, but music can also affect a group of individuals. These groups mix and bond and share similar experiences and ideas whether it is joy or sorrow. The Protest Pop video has truly opened up my eyes to the true meaning of reform though music. Its compelling facts of history created an even more real and relatable interest for me. The music used to escort these ideas also aided in my understanding of what was going on at the time and what the people were actually thinking and feeling. Music is so touching and influential that it is utilized as protest propaganda, for monetary aid, and most importantly uniting people together. After watching Protest Pop, I have realized how powerful music can be as a driving force for change.

War is damaging as we all may know. It not only affects our lives in terms of finance but it also brings about death and destruction. Artists such as Bruce Springsteen, Pete Seeger and many others protested through song against these atrocities. Probably the most famous anti-war song was “War” by Springsteen. He asked and answered, “War! What it is good for? Absolutely nothing”. After hearing this song, I immediately recognized the tune, but I never actually deciphered lyrics or matched it to the Vietnam War. I asked myself what war really was good for, and the only response I could come up with was absolutely nothing. Was it because I really thought that or was it because I just heard Springsteen’s great brainwashing tune? The point is that Springsteen’s song was so catchy and so relevant that it was inescapably wedged in my mind. Now that I know it was a protest song about the war...
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