Political, Social and Economical Impacts on the 2010 World Cup

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FIFA World Cup South Africa 2010:
The Social, Economical and Political Impacts

Communication: Outcome 2 Summative Assessment

Graeme Boyle
November 2010

Table of Contents
2.Overview of the Event3
2.1 Social impact4
2.2 Political Impact5
2.3 Economic impact6

1. Introduction
The FIFA World Cup is one of the largest sporting events in existence, happening every four years in different country across the world. As with any other major event a windfall of social, political and economic impacts that affect the host nation can be seen. This report has been requested by Caroline Patterson and Mark Hetherington on the social, political and economic impact of a major event, in this instance the 2010 FIFA World Cup held in South Africa. The report is to be submitted week beginning December 8th 2010. Before compiling this report, extensive research has been completed on all aspects of the World Cup’s impact on South Africa and a conclusion of finding has been included.

2. Overview of the Event
The World Cup has a vast history dating back to 1930 in Uruguay right up to the recent 2010 tournament in South Africa. This event brings the best players from across the world together to compete for all to see. It has the ability to dominate world media for weeks and to put the world on the edge of its seats. Some people say it is the most important sporting event in existence.

2.1 Social impact
Any mega event, like the World Cup, can have a huge social impact on the host nation, and any international viewers. The most common impact generated by this event is as simple as the shared experience of the entire world watching it together. This shared experience creates a feeling of unison between those involved, which can lead to friendships forming in the future. Hosting the World Cup gave some well needed attention to some of the social issues within South Africa. With help from Nelson Mandela, the government has been trying to deal with these problems. With the eyes of the world firmly focused on South Africa it has been seen that people reveal these troubles and criticise them, therefore pressuring South Africa to deal with them. A good example of how the citizens of South Africa were alienated would be to look at Cape Town, and the construction of the new stadium set to host the semi-finals. For the past 20 years or so the site for the stadium was home to an informal trade market, with over 800 traders meeting there each week to earn their living. In the built up to the event, the local council moved all homeless people in the city into an encampment outside of the city centre, away from the tourists. Tony Roshan Samara, of George Mason University in Virginia, has been writing a book on Cape Town for the last few years. His comment on the camp was "It is an encampment where they have moved all of the homeless or many of the homeless who were downtown," he added "And it is essentially a razor wire encampment where they are being kept and this is only the most egregious issue of displacement." These are just few examples of how local councils in South Africa alienated sections of its citizenship during the World Cup. Instead of taking the opportunity to improve the living quality of these people and protect their financial future the government set them to the side. This is an obvious negative social impact of the World Cup, one which the government could have avoided if it implemented effective strategies, used by other countries during mega events, to relocate its inhabitants.

2.2 Political Impact
Events have been used for centuries by politicians as tools to distract their nation from various social deprivations. President Zuma is no exception to this, bringing the World Cup to South Africa to change the nation for the better. The World Cup 2010 has made huge political impacts on the nation, as well as the continent of...
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