Poison Ivy

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  • Topic: Poison ivy, Urushiol-induced contact dermatitis, Toxicodendron
  • Pages : 1 (332 words )
  • Download(s) : 412
  • Published : April 24, 2013
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Poison Ivy
The poison ivy rash is caused by the plant poison ivy which contains an oily resin called urushiol, which is found on the stem, leaves and root of the plant. Poison ivy is very sticky and can stick to your skin, clothes and tools that come into contact with the plant. You can get the poison ivy rash from direct contact, touching something that is contaminated and the most dangerous when the plant is burned inhalation of the smoke from the plant. Once you have the rash, the rash itself is not contagious unless there is still urushiol on your skin and clothes. (Mayo Clinic, 2012)

The symptoms of the rash poison ivy are itchy skin where you came into contact with the urushiol, hives, and blisters filled with fluid. The rash poison ivy usually develops around 8 to 48 hours after contact with the plant and can take up to a week to develop if it is your first time being in contact with the plant. After having poison ivy rash once and coming in contact again the rash may appear more quickly. The poison ivy rash will continue to spread to all the places where the plant was in contact with your skin. (Healthwise, 2011)

The treatment of the rash or contact dermatitis is a antihistamine lotion and pills or calamine lotion for the not so severe rash. If the rash is severe you may have to get steroid shot, pills or lotion to help clear the rash. The best way to getting rid of the rash quick is not to scratch the rash. how long the rash takes to go away depends on the person and varies. (Mayo Clinic, 2012)

Refrences
Mayo Clinic. (2012, august 29). Poison ivy rash. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/poison-ivy/DS00774/DSECTION=treatments-and-drugs Healthwise. (2011, august 30). Poison ivy, oak, or sumac. Retrieved from http://www.webmd.com/allergies/tc/poison-ivy-oak-or-sumac-treatment-overview
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