Poetry Explication

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Poetry Explication
The Lamb and The Tyger

When Reading William Blake’s poems form the song of innocence and song of experience readers get how both links to each other to create a greater meaning. The Lamb from the song of innocence shows the innocence of god in a person, while The Tyger shows the experience of a person. Paired together, William Blake’s poem The Lamb and The Tyger uses biblical symbolism and diction to illustrate the perspective of religion both good and bad. The titles of the poems have strong symbolism one is found to be godlike, while the other has a negative feel to it. Both poems use diction the contradict each other, in The Lamb the diction used is considered more like celestial words. The Tyger has dark diction, that shows a little of the evil that there is in life.

In the first poem from the song of innocence, there is a use of soft spoken words, angelic words like delight, bright, tender, and rejoice. Words like the ones listed lead to the idea of the biblical symbolism that the poem contains. On the other hand, the poem from the song of experience has dark words, compared to The Lamb, such like dark, burning, deadly, terrors, dread, and distant. Both imply to different allusions biblically, one can be said to allude or symbolize to god and the other to the devil.

The first stanza of The Lamb starts with a question, “Little Lamb who made thee?” (line 1), and this quote from the poem is repeated several times throughout the poem. The interpretation that can be made about this quote is the immediate connection a little lamb has to god and innocence, therefore the last part of this question used in the first stanza is “..who made thee?” to readers thinking that god is who makes little lambs. After first quote it is followed up by a similar question, the speaker asking the “little lamb” if he or she knows who made thee.

Unlike The lamb, the poem from the song of experience starts with an engaging line “Tyger! Tyger!...
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