Poetry Close Reading: John Clare's 'I Am'

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Poetry, Stanza, Madrid Metro
  • Pages : 4 (1586 words )
  • Download(s) : 421
  • Published : August 5, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Coursework Header Sheet200170-8 ||

Course|COML1054: CTC: Poetry and Drama|Course School/Level|HU/UG| Coursework|Poetry Close Reading|Assessment Weight|20.00%|
Tutor|HG Derbyshire, ED Jones, A King|Submission Deadline|06/11/2012|

Analyse a Romantic poem showing understanding of context and form. 1,500 words.|

Coursework is receipted on the understanding that it is the student's own work and that it has not, in whole or part, been presented elsewhere for assessment. Where material has been used from other sources it has been properly acknowledged in accordance with the University's Regulations regarding Cheating and Plagiarism.|

000659175 Cherry Hurley
Tutor's comments |

Grade Awarded___________|For Office Use Only__________|Final Grade_________| Moderation required: yes/no|Tutor______________________|Date _______________|

From the very beginning of John Clare’s ‘I Am’, there is an overwhelming sense of conflict, not only between the narrator and the world around them, but what is most striking and beautifully honest, is the conflict within. It is clear that the narrator, who is unnamed and unidentified in terms of gender, is struggling with life, shown through their obvious desire to leave this world and enter another; “I long for scenes where man hath never trod,” (Line 13) -spoken in the last stanza along with other phrases such as ‘the vaulted sky’ (18) and ‘sweetly slept’ (16), giving a distinct impression of heaven as the place that he longs to be, tinting the poem with darker shades of suicide and suicidal thoughts. The first thing that sprung out to me about the poem, naturally, was the title: I Am hits the reader with an unexpectedly authentic burst of human emotion with just three simple letters or two simple words. Not only does the word ‘I’ scream out with sharp, personal depth, but the fact that what the narrator claims to be is unstated gives the poem a...
tracking img